When installing a hot tub, or determining where to put the hot tub, one dimension is very important. The hot tub's height indicates where the hot tub will go and how your family can best enter and exit the water without harm. Know this dimension before you buy your next spa or hot tub.

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The height of a hot tub is important for installation.

Standard Heights

While there are no standard heights for hot tubs, most measure around 36 inches high. Normal hot tubs fall within the range of 34 to 42 inches high, and any hot tub over that height is generally considered too high, which is not to say that a custom tub cannot measure higher than 42 inches. Deeper tubs suit taller individuals and may install in the ground next to a pool.

Height and Depth

The depth of the hot tub is different from the height. While the height measurement refers to the distance from the bottom of the tub to the top of the outside edge of the exterior wall, the depth refers to how deep the water is. Normal hot tubs have walls that extend 5 to 6 inches above the water line, adding additional height to the tub. For instance, a 36-inch tub has a depth of 31 inches while a 42-inch tub has a depth of 37.5 inches.

Height Considerations

A hot tub does not require steps for entry and exit if it is only 36 inches in height, but steps do make entry easier. A 42-inch hot tub will require steps for children and most average size adults. Climbing over the walls of a hot tub not only risks injury to your person but also may damage the hot tub. A set of stairs the same height or slightly lower than the hot tub's height provides the best access into and out of the water. Some stairs rise up to the very top of the hot tub while others rise 7 inches below the top. The occupants step up and over the hot tub wall to enter the tub.

In-ground Hot Tub Heights

A hot tub is meant for soaking and relaxing, so it does not have to be very deep. Even in-ground hot tubs are limited in height, with most having a depth of 31 inches and a total height of around 37 inches. Little need exists to make the tub deeper. A very deep hot tub poses a health risk because occupants may submerge completely beneath the water. Deeper tubs also use more energy because they hold more water and more energy is required to heat more water.