How to Wire a Tanning Bed

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Wire a Tanning Bed

If you've recently purchased a tanning bed for use in your home, you're probably curious about how to set it up. Do you need any special electrical components? How much power will it require? In most cases, wiring a tanning bed for residential use is quite simple and costs very little.

Step 1

Read the manual that came with your tanning bed to learn the voltage your new tanning bed uses. Most tanning beds are 120 or 220 volts.

Step 2

Determine whether your home's electrical outlet will handle the tanning bed. If your tanning bed runs on 120 volts, then chances are your tanning bed will work in a standard electrical outlet. Some larger tanning beds require 220 volts.

Step 3

Contact an electrician if your tanning bed uses 220 volts. In this case, you will need to have a new outlet installed.

Step 4

Locate an electrical outlet that can be used exclusively for the tanning bed. To prevent electrical overloads, it is best to have one outlet dedicated solely to your tanning bed.

Step 5

Consider installing a buck-booster to lower or raise the voltage used in your tanning bed. Contact the company you purchased the tanning bed from to determine whether or not a buck-booster is needed.

Tip

Before purchasing your tanning bed, you will want to check to see whether or not it uses 120 volts or 220 volts--it is probably a more affordable option for you to find a tanning bed that uses only 120 volts. Consider investing in a maintenance program. Many companies offer maintenance plans to help fund the cost of future repairs. Contrary to what you may expect, the cost of running a tanning bed is very minimal. In fact, the average cost is only 5 cents per 15-minute session.

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Jessica Saras

Jessica Saras is a professional editor and copywriter. After earning an English degree from Reinhardt College, Saras completed the summer writing program at Sarah Lawrence College. A natural-born writer, she has more than six years of experience in web content development. In addition to being a full-time copywriter, she writes articles for Demand Studios, wiseGEEK.com, Examiner.com, and Suite101.com.