Homemade Bug Fogger

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Things You'll Need

  • Cold water

  • Dry ice

  • Mask

  • Hair-dryer or fan

  • Protective gloves

  • Tarp or sheet

Warning

Take proper precautions when handling dry ice. Make sure that it does not come in contact with your skin, as it can cause burning. Wear gloves and use tongs whenever you can.

Bugs of all shapes and sizes can find their way into your home.

The presence of bugs in and around your home during warmer months can be the source of great frustration. Though there is little you can do to prevent bugs from being around your house, the you can defend the inside of your home against the annoyances of invading insects. Use a bug fogger to eliminate a bug infestation in your home. Bug foggers are gas bombs that utilize a high concentration of insect-lethal chemicals to eliminate bugs no matter where they are hiding. Rather than purchasing a commercial bug fogger, make one yourself.

Step 1

Fill a large bucket or pan up with cool water and place it in the room that you want fogged. For an average-sized room of 200 square feet, use 6 to 10 cups of water. For each additional 100 square feet, add an additional 6 cups of water. If you are fogging your entire house, start at the room farthest away from any entrance. Place the bucket or pan on a tarp on the floor of the room and close all windows. Place a small fan or hair-dryer on low in one corner of the room.

Step 2

Cover your face with a face mask or wet rag. For an average-sized room, use about 1 lb. of dry ice, submerging it into the water. For each additional 100 square feet, add an additional 1 lb. dry ice. This will cause a dense fog to rise up. The fog is basically concentrated CO2, which will suffocate and kill all of the bugs in the room. Pour a few additional cups of cool water on top of the dry ice to create more billowing fog. The fan will circulate the fog, so leave the room for 10 minutes to one hour.

Step 3

Return to the room once the dry ice has evaporated and the room is still somewhat foggy. Open a window if possible to help clear the fog. Repeat these steps for all the rooms you want fogged. The process should take about an hour per room.

references

Cameron Burry

Cameron Burry has been writing professionally since 2006. He received his Associate of Arts degree from Lakeland College for English and writing, and holds two degrees from Murray State University: one in creative writing and one in English literature.