7 Attic Playrooms That'll Make You Want to Be a Kid Again

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Between an attic's pitched walls, limited light, and physical distance from the rest of your house, the top story can be a conundrum to decorate. But these spaces can make great playrooms. Your little ones likely won't be bothered by the slanted ceilings, and the whole family will enjoy having a separate quiet space for games. But how do you begin designing your own attic playroom?

We gathered seven zones that'll inspire both you and the kiddos. These spaces are so sweet, they'll make you want to be a kid again (as if you don't already).

1. Keep the decor on the walls.

Floor space is key for playtime — that's where the block towers are built, tea parties happen, and tickle fights tend to break out. So add simple decor to your playroom walls, like these felt animal heads, to keep the ground clear for toys and a play kitchen.

Get the look: Maisonette Mini Elephant with Tusks, $50

2. Carve out space for a homework station.

Chances are you'll have to ask, "Did you do your homework?" a lot less when your little one is equipped with a homework space so cool any adult would be jealous. Studio McGee kept this attic office simple with a sleek desk, statement art, desk lamp, and all the tools your kiddo will need to solve algebra problems.

Get the look: World Market Graywashed Calder Desk, $299.99

3. Add a sweet swing chair.

Kate Marker Interiors knows one sure-fire way into a kid's heart: Hang a swing chair. Younger children will find it exciting, while older kiddos can use the suspended seat as a spot for relaxing and reading. This one is anchored to the ceiling with a textured rope that adds interest to an otherwise streamlined, minimal room. Add a blanket, a pillow, and a book for a good old fashioned swing session. Doesn't it sound relaxing just thinking about it?

Get the look: Serena & Lily Hanging Rattan Chair, $498

4. Use wall decals to brighten things up.

An attic's slanted ceiling isn't such a drag when its dressed up with wall decals like the ones Chango & Co. used in this playroom. These polka dot stickers brighten up the walls in a perfectly imperfect way, so don't stress too much when applying them. Best yet, they're super easy to remove when your kids outgrow the look. Simply peel them off, and dream up a new design.

Get the look: SimpleShapes Watercolor Dots Wall Stickers, $33.15

5. Fill a bench with cozy pillows.

After a long afternoon of building LEGOS or playing with dolls, a comfortable built-in bench will be just what your kids need to curl up and relax. Mimi and Hill designed this attic space with an extra cozy bench thanks to plenty of pillows and a plush cushion. If snacks are loaded up on the side table, even better.

Get the look: Urban Outfitters Rumi Shag Throw Pillow, $49

6. Use carpet tiles for a graphic look and easy cleanup.

One thing is sure about playrooms: Messes are bound to happen there. That's why carpet tiles are perfect for an attic playroom. They're extra durable and able to withstand spills. This checkered look, designed by Mel Bean Interiors, adds graphic interest and coordinates with the white ceiling and printed wallpaper. Plus, if a painting project goes awry, you can always swap out a tile or two without ripping up the entire carpet.

Get the look: FLOR Made You Look Carpet Tiles, $14 per tile

7. Invest in chalkboard paint.

Sometimes it is okay to draw on the walls! When you add a couple of layers of chalkboard paint to your attic playroom, you can bring out the mini Georgia O'Keeffe in your kids. Incorporate inspiring quotes, tic-tac-toe games, and imaginative drawings of your own, too. This versatile surface can even look chic when paired with art deco furniture.

Get the look: Benjamin Moore Chalkboard Paint


Megan writes about design, travel and wellness for Domino, Lonny, Wit & Delight and more. Her life rules include: zipper when merging, tip in cash and contribute to your IRA. Be a pal and subscribe to her newsletter Night Vision.

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