7 Pretty Bathroom Floor Tile Ideas to Pin (Even If You're Not Remodeling)

Even if you're not planning for a design overhaul, that doesn't mean you can't scroll through Pinterest for major inspo (in fact, we do it all the time). We've set our sights lately on the most dreamy bathroom floor tile ideas, since they are a plenty. Mosaics that transport us to faraway places, marble that sets our hearts aflutter, patterns that give in to our quirky side … we can't get enough. We're not sure when it first happened, but tile is now a total design expression in the washroom, going beyond its humble origins as an easy (and hygienic) option from a fabrication standpoint.

Below, take a peek at the bathroom floor tile ideas that we can't look away from — and really want to incorporate into our own homes.

1. Make it allover marble.

Yes, designers have long been on board the marble bandwagon, but this time designer Jaclyn Peters is going all out. Instead of just focusing on bathroom floor tile, she expanded the idea and used the material on top of the vanity cabinet as well as the bathtub surround. She chose a stone with a green-tinged veining to promote a natural feel, further emphasized by leafy art prints and high windows that flood the room with sunlight.

2. Transport yourself.

Gorgeous patterned bathroom floor tile will take you somewhere exotic — no passport required. In this pretty space, brought to life by designer Amber Lewis, eclectic flooring infuses a ton of charm with minimal effort. Work with neutral tones so it blends with the rest of your home's aesthetics.

3. Pretty it up with mosaic.

mosaic bathroom floor tile idea in white bathroom with freestanding tub
credit: Chango & Co.

You can never go wrong with an almost all-white bathroom (although, keeping it clean is another story). From the built-in storage cabinets to the dressing area, the only real variation in in this washroom is found in metallic accents, a floral arrangement, and of course, the mosaic floor tile. From white to gray, the hexagonal marble creates a dynamic effect. Pro tip: Opt for hues that are complementary instead of contrasting so it won't feel too busy.

4. Take it dark.

Washrooms are often synonymous with light, airy shades. Venture away from the norm by taking a hint from the deep-blue hexagonal bathroom tile used by Daleet Spector. White grout pops against the dark flooring and white subway tile lines the shower stall, keeping it from veering too dark. No matter which bold hue you choose, offset it with a slightly lighter vanity. After all, a slight variation is the new matchy-matchy.

5. Try something unexpected.

unique bathroom floor tile idea in farmhouse bath
credit: Chango & Co.

This gingham bathroom floor tile idea reminds us of a picnic but only in the best, walk-in-the-park sort of way. The rustic wooden vanity plays nicely with the retro vibe and a pair of green wall sconces. Remember that a large-scale mirror like this is always your friend when incorporating bolder prints — it opens up the space by tricking the eye into thinking there's more square footage.

6. Say something.

This playful bathroom designed by Dichotomy Interiors is statement making at its best — literally. The entire room is instantly transformed thanks to yellow wall sconces and text spelled out on the floor with contrasting black penny tile. The word "wash" brings a quirky sense of fun to an otherwise simple design (props for not taking itself too seriously). Not sure what to spell out? Remember that shorter words make more of an impact. Think: the more blank space, the better.

7. Play with placement.

Time for a geometry lesson — bathroom floor tile in varying shapes, sizes, and shades of gray inject this Emily Henderson-designed loo with some serious depth. The marble flooring is almost mesmerizing, so the remaining color palette should be simple. In this washroom, the crisp, navy wainscoting is a sharp but necessary contrast to help define the space.


Michelle Guerrere

Michelle Guerrere

Michelle Guerrere is a NYC-based lifestyle, fashion and beauty writer. She's currently trying to find the best set-up for her 300-sq. ft. Manhattan apartment.