These Traditional Entryway Table Ideas Are Instant Classics

Hunker may earn compensation through affiliate links in this story.

There are so many things to love about traditional style. The neutral, quiet color palettes that are oh-so-soothing to the eye. The wood finishes and classic materials that have been around for centuries, ever since chic European homeowners popularized the aesthetic.

Although the timeless look can blend into a wide variety of spaces, there's one piece of furniture in particular that combines all of those characteristics beautifully: a traditional entryway table. It's an ideal way to showcase your cherished decorative accents near the front door, setting the tone for the rest of the house. Not to mention, it also acts as a convenient landing place for your keys, sunglasses, and other on-the-go essentials.

But not just any old table will do. Ahead you'll find eight traditional entryway tables worthy of your home's grand entrance.

1. Aim for a neutral palette.

Neutrals are definitely a signature characteristic of traditional style, and traditional entryway tables are no exception. Get inspired by this foyer designed by Shea of Studio McGee, which combines modern artwork, classic ceramics, and a black-and-white color palette.

Get the look: McGee & Co. Allen Console, $1,500

2. Try a non-console option.

Even though we adore a console table or sideboard in an entryway, we're also open to a conventional table as well, if space allows for it. Emily Henderson chose a vintage 1950s option to bring an eye-catching pop to this otherwise traditional space.

Get the look: Edward Wormley Sheaf of Wheat Table in Teak & Travertine, $2,200

3. Consider natural materials.

Traditional style easily embraces airy colors and textures, so it makes sense to display an entryway table rendered in natural materials. For instance, this beauty from Lulu and Georgia is made of handwoven teak, adding a dash of visual interest.

Get the look: Lulu and Georgia Sian Sideboard in Natural, $2,957

4. Include thoughtful decor.

A traditional entryway table is an ideal way to present your style right at the door. Outfit it with warm, curated accents, like pillows and baskets, metallic lamps, candles, and a round mirror to tie it all together, like Katie of Halfway Wholeistic did in her home.

Get the look: World Market Everett Foyer Table, $329.99

5. Sometimes, simplicity is best.

There's no need to go over the top in a traditional entryway. Actually, we advise going simple, even minimal, if that fits your style. Consider a small console table outfitted with vintage finds and artwork, a look we love in this home styled by Jenny of Juniper Home.

Get the look: Gracie Oaks Parlington Console Table, $175.99

6. Go for a luxe look.

For decades, traditional style has emulated grace, sophistication, and even a bit of luxury. For elegant visuals that feel incredibly plush, set up your traditional entryway table with upholstered stools, a Grecian bust, and timeless wall art, items that Kat of Carrie Bradshaw Lied chose for this corner of her home.

Get the look: Ballard Designs Tibet Console Table, $699

7. Focus on clean lines.

"Fussy" is never a word used to describe traditional design. On the contrary, you'll want to keep your entryway looking sleek and polished with pieces like a linear console table and streamlined, yet striking, decor, something that Amber Lewis of Amber Interiors achieved in this foyer.

Get the look: Shoppe by Amber Interiors Anderson Console, $5,200

8. Have a little fun.

Traditional style can sometimes lend itself to Hollywood Regency design. The traditional pieces will still shine, like a cool-yet-classic sideboard and ageless vases, but you can always punch things up with a door in a bold hue and oversize decorative pieces that push the envelope a tad. We think that Jennifer and Joanna of J & J Design Group nailed the approach in this entryway.

Get the look: Article Geome Sideboard, $1,099


Shelby Deering is a lifestyle writer who contributes to national magazines and websites, including Country Living, Good Housekeeping, Well+Good, and more. When she's not writing, you'll find her shopping flea markets, hiking, and going for walks with her corgi.

View Work