What Is a Pot Filler Faucet?

Hunker may earn compensation through affiliate links in this story. Learn more about our affiliate and product review process here.

If you find yourself going back and forth from the stove to the sink with a large pot and getting exhausted in the process, then upgrading to a pot filler faucet might be the right choice for you. Is it actually something feasible you can add in your kitchen, and is it something you actually need? Choosing the right pot filler that is suitable for your kitchen and determining whether or not it is even feasible to install in your kitchen requires a little research.

Advertisement

Tip

A pot filler faucet is essentially a water spigot mounted above your stove. It works like an articulated arm, allowing you to easily fill any pot on your stove, saving you a trip to the kitchen sink.

What Is a Pot Filler Faucet?

Pot filling faucets started in restaurants to fill very large pots with water for boiling on the stove — an understandable need for a fast-paced kitchen environment. These faucets are swing-arm-style faucets that are mounted above a stove within usable reach and are used to fill large pots of water. After the pot is filled, the swing arm simply pushes out of the way until it is needed again. These kitchen faucets only require one cold water pipe to achieve their function.

Advertisement

Video of the Day

Pot Filler Faucet Pros

Anyone who has boiled a large pot of water can tell you that it can be heavy to carry it from the kitchen sink to the stove top. A 12-quart or 3-gallon pot of water can weigh almost 12 pounds (not including the pot itself). A pot filler spout mounted near the cooktop saves at least one trip of carrying those 12 pounds between the sink and the stove. A kitchen pot filler may be used in an ADA-compliant home for those with a disability that prohibits them from carrying such a large vessel of water.

Advertisement

One obvious advantage of having a kitchen pot filler over a simple kitchen faucet is the height of the faucet. Many times, pot filling faucets are mounted on the wall or installed at a height that allows for the filling of large vessels. Some of these vessels may include tall vases, humidifiers, carpet steamers, and large coffee pots. The fact that these faucets can have a higher flow rate gives them a large advantage over the flow rate of a standard kitchen sink faucet, making filling these huge vessels quicker and easier.

Advertisement

Pot Filler Faucet Cons

Even though these kitchen faucets of convenience make life easier, they can create a few issues. Along with the possibility of collecting grease, another issue is that they are usually mounted above or near the stove without any source of drain under them, so a leaky faucet can make a real mess of things quickly. Throw in the installation over an electric cooktop, and now you have created a potentially dangerous combination of electricity and water.

Advertisement

Another potential issue involves the style of kitchen pot filler you choose. Most have articulating swing arms that can leak over time, creating a watery mess for your cooktop if not addressed accordingly. The same thing can happen if it is used infrequently. Gaskets inside the swing arms can dry out, creating leaks.

Another consideration is that water may be left in the swing arm piping if the pot filler is not used often. This concern is not that big of a deal if you're filling a pot of water to be boiled, but if you are filling a container of water to make a large cooler of lemonade for neighborhood kids, the lemonade could possibly be contaminated.

Advertisement

Advertisement

What to Look for in a Pot Filler Faucet

Like any kitchen or bath home improvement project, selecting fixtures that match your needs as well as your decor is essential. Choosing quality brands is essential in assuring that the fixture fits your needs for years to come. Companies like Moen, Delta, and Kohler have been in the plumbing fixture business almost as long as water has been flowing through pipes, so choosing manufacturers with that kind of experience and innovation may be the obvious choice. There are a few lesser-known manufacturers, like T&S Brass. This company has been on the commercial side of the industry, making quality kitchen faucets that can withstand abuse, but these may not be the right choice for your home kitchen.

Advertisement

One consideration for any project is budget, but a more budget-friendly kitchen faucet is not always the best idea because a leak can cause damage. A budget-friendly fixture can induce the damage quicker than one that's less budget-friendly.

You also must consider your decor. Does it match the rest of the fixtures? Does it come in stainless steel, brass, or matte black? This consideration might prove to be a little more difficult. For instance, if you choose a kitchen sink faucet from one manufacturer but that manufacturer does not make a pot filling faucet, then there may be some sacrifice. With some manufacturers, like Delta, you may only be able to access matching plumbing fixtures from certain retailers or from Delta trade distributors. A quality kitchen renovation requires some forethought when choosing fixtures.

Advertisement

Single-Handle vs. Two-Handle Pot Filler

A single-handle pot filler is not going to be the best option for a residential kitchen faucet. Most quality manufacturers provide a two-handle configuration. There is nowhere for the water to drip in the event of a leaky faucet, so having two valves provides a little backup. Having a two-handle pot filler gives the cook a little more peace of mind while creating that culinary masterpiece.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Flow Rate Considerations

When selecting the right kitchen faucet, one serious consideration is flow rate. The normal kitchen faucet typically flows at 2 gallons per minute (GPM), while most pot filling faucets flow at around 4 to 5 GPM. One of the reasons you want this style of kitchen faucet is to simplify your water boiling experience. Waiting for a 5-gallon pot to fill at 2 GPM can be as torturous as watching that 5 gallons of water boil. Compare the specification sheet of each manufacturer's kitchen faucet to make sure it is going to provide your need for speed.

Advertisement

Wall-Mount Kitchen Faucet

The extent of your kitchen renovations will decide the mounting configuration of your new pot filler. A total gutting of your kitchen can give you the option of a wall-mount pot filling faucet. The wall mount is a very elegant look and adds function without taking up any counter space.

This option has a significant downfall if you plan to mount the faucet on an exterior wall. If you live in a colder climate, any plumber will advise against putting water piping in exterior walls due to the potential for frozen pipes, especially a pipe providing water to a fixture that does not get used often. If possible, try to mount the fixture to an inside wall.

Deck-Mount Pot Filler Faucet

If you're simply replacing the countertops or just looking to add a pot filler faucet to your existing kitchen, the deck mount might be less intrusive to the kitchen home improvement. The installation is simpler, and protection from exposure in cold climates makes this a reasonable option.

A deck-mounting configuration does have its downfalls. One is counter space, which is always a hot topic for any serious cook. There is never enough counter space when creating a large meal for a hungry crew.

Advertisement

Another disadvantage of the deck mount is the single hole in the countertop. This single hole is not as easy to repair on a countertop as a single hole in a wall. If you should decide that the pot filler is not working out, a hole in your granite countertop is not so easy to repair.

Pot Filler Faucet Location

The location of the pot filler is important to its effectiveness. The location needs to be high enough to allow a tall vessel to be filled while safely filling the pot without the need for reaching over a hot stove. The location should be on the right or left of the stove and approximately 12 to 18 inches above the stove top. Be sure to check your local building code to make sure this is true for your installation. Some local codes will have you refer to the manufacturer's installation instructions. Following the instructions should prevent damage due to extreme heat coming off the cooking surface.

How to Install a Pot Filler Faucet

No matter what pot filler you choose, the installation will require plumbing a new cold water line to the location of the new pot filler. This will require some DIY plumbing skills. These skills will include cutting into the main cold water piping and running new piping with either PEX, CPVC, or copper piping. It is always recommended to install shutoff valves directly off a main water line that feeds directly to a fixture. If you are uncomfortable with plumbing, this is when it is time to call a plumber.

Choosing to have a wall-mounted pot filler may also require the use of some DIY carpentry skills. Additionally, if you do decide to put the pot filler on an exterior wall, you will need to make sure that there is insulation between the piping and the outside sheathing. This keeps the pipe from sweating as well as unintentionally exposing it to freezing temperatures. You may also need some special tools to cut a single hole through your backsplash, which may be a material that's difficult to work with.

The deck-mount installation will also require the right-size hole saw for cutting the countertop. This may require one that can cut through your countertop, which may be made of a material that is difficult to work with. More consideration may be necessary depending on your specific situation.

Once the installation is complete, you will want to run the water for a while to assure no contamination from opening the cold system. Once you are satisfied that there is no contamination, enjoy having a big group over for a pasta dinner.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Report an Issue

screenshot of the current page

Screenshot loading...