Getting rid of wolf rats is a fairly simple task provided you are thorough and quick to act. These rats are like most rodents, and control methods are basically the same as well. Start with the simplest, most humane treatments and escalate only if necessary to solve the problem.

Step 1

Spread a predatory animal urine product in the attic, basement or other location where the rats have established themselves. The notion of a predator nearby will often cause the colony to move somewhere "safer." Be sure to spread the product evenly throughout the application area so that the colony doesn't just move over a few feet.

Step 2

Deploy rat traps for pernicious, but small, infestations. Large colonies will likely be unaffected by this method, but smaller families will be quickly persuaded to break camp as individual members start disappearing.

Step 3

Set up poison bait sections if rat traps prove ineffective. For larger colonies, these have a broader scope and will be more useful than the rat traps.

Step 4

Contact an exterminator if your problem has not subsided. Serious infestations consist of rats in walls, crawl spaces, attics, and nearly every other nook and cranny in the home. For these, a true professional is needed.

Step 5

Address the underlying cause of the infestation to avoid a recurrence. Rotting or cracked home exteriors, unclean living spaces, and poorly kept landscapes with rotting debris can all attract wolf rats. Think about possible food sources for the animals and remove them. Use airtight, chew-proof canisters for foodstuffs that are being ransacked, and seal off any wall holes that permit access to pantries, pet food, or other food locations.