A 1980s Apartment Is Transformed Into a Curved Wonderland

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When architect Laura Ortín began work on a family's apartment in Murcia, Spain, she found that the ongoing pandemic brought up a whole new set of design considerations. After experiencing stay-at-home orders, Ortín says she asked herself, "Could this new house hold up to another confinement?" The architect knew that the home needed to be adaptable and encourage the well being of its occupants. A bright, flexible, and healthy space, she notes, would be able to withstand any future situation.

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She overhauled the 1980s apartment, which was extremely compartmentalized, creating larger, more interchangeable rooms. Curved walls give the space an organic and almost-futuristic feel and the terrace was expanded to give the family more outdoor space. Ortín also incorporated pandemic-era essentials such as a place to work from home — as well as relax — within the primary bedroom. Pleated curtains made of acoustic felt separate the main living area from the bedrooms, adding privacy when needed.

The emphasis on health and wellbeing is also shown in the materials Ortín chose. The architect used no acrylics in the project, opting instead for natural materials such as bamboo, lime paints, and chalk lacquers. Thanks to Ortín's focus on flexibility and wellness, the apartment will be a safe haven for the family for years to come.

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living area
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Living room

The living room opens onto the newly expanded terrace. The shelves, coffee table, and cabinets were custom designed by Laura Ortín Arquitectura.

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hallway
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Hallway

Pleated acoustic felt curtains separate the living room and kitchen from the bedrooms.

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bedroom
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Bedroom

The primary bedroom has a work area that can transform into a relaxation space by folding down the built-in desk.

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bedroom
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Bedroom

The custom headboard serves as a room divider and offers built-in storage and lighting. Ortín used a terra cotta hue in the parents' spaces.

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primary bathroom
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Primary Bathroom

The deep pink color palette and sculptural curved elements continue in the primary bathroom.

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kids room
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Kid's Room

Ortín chose a playful mint green for the kids' room, incorporating it in a playmat, a geometric animal head, and graphic wall mural. Montessori beds by LUFE are accompanied by IKEA bedside tables.

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Elizabeth Stamp is a freelance writer in Los Angeles. Her work has appeared in Architectural Digest, Elle Decor, and CNN Style.