Keep Calm and Reduce Anxiety Using These Things at Home

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Hello, friend. Are you home? Me too. I hope that you're OK. I hope that you are connecting with people online or by phone, or with your sweetheart or friend in the next room. I hope you have toilet paper, because, jeez, where did it all go? I hope that you have all the food and medicine and water you need. And even if you do have all those things, and have a support system of people who love you, you still might be feeling anxious/scared/worried/sad/confused.

I hear you, and I've found some things below that might help, in some small way, to relieve your anxiety and help you feel comfortable, sane, and grounded at home. I'm not a doctor, I'm not a therapist — I'm just like you, experiencing this, too. And these ideas can possibly offer comfort during this coronavirus outbreak. Because they're doing it for me.

Weighted Blanket

A weighted blanket, like the Gravity Blanket, can make you feel good, immediately. It can help you feel safe and cozy, while curbing anxiety. It feels like a big hug — something we all could use right now, yes? Visit its site to read more about the science of why it works.

Aromatherapy

Get yourself a diffuser and start diffusing scents throughout your day, such as a de-stress blend or an immune-support blend. This Hunker article offers five different recipes you can make, depending on your needs (plus a suggestion for a diffuser that we just love). Scents really do affect our moods while cleansing the air.

Yoga Bolster

I got this yoga bolster as a birthday present last year, and I use it often. I often stretch my back over it, open up my arms, and do some deep breathing. It's quite the heart opener. Use it for yoga, use it for stretching … your choice.

Calming Eye Pillow

We suspect you might be on your computer or on your phone _a lot_– checking the news and social media – so give your eyes (and psyche) a break. Not only is this eye pillow an easy project to make, but you'll end up with a soothing eye pillow that's perfect for when you need to just close your eyes a bit or when you want to fall asleep.

The Boy, the Mole, the Fox and the Horse

Image Credit: Laurie Grossman

This book is so exquisitely delightful. It's magical. I had it sitting on my coffee table, but recently moved it to my new work-from-home desk space. Get one for yourself, get some for your tribe. "Everyone is a bit scared," said the horse. "But we are less scared together." (Also, go follow the author Charlie Mackesy on Instagram for something positive to look at on social media.)

Exercise and/or Stretch

Order some dumbells and resistance bands, or grab a yoga mat — exercise is a great anxiety-reliever. There are a large variety of classes you can take in the comfort of your own home. Look into apps such as Obé or classes offered on YouTube and Instagram. We've got a list of some faves here.

Keep a Gratitude Journal

Just five minutes a day, that's all. A bit in the morning and a bit in the evening, write down three things you're grateful for, and then three positive things that happened during your day. The Five-Minute Journal makes this activity easy to do, or just use a bullet journal. Sometimes, especially during this particular time, you may feel as though it's hard to find something to be grateful for … but, it's there. I keep mine on my bedside table within reach.

Meditation

Image Credit: Paul Anderson for Hunker

If you do one thing, out of all the things, this might be the most impactful for your wellbeing. Just give it a chance, if you're not already doing it. There are many options out there to explore, from TM to Headspace to Ziva to Waking Up. (Or, simply sit and focus on your breath for several minutes.) You've got nothing to lose, and really so much to gain.

Pet Your Animals!

Image Credit: Paul Anderson for Hunker

If you have a cute animal at home, perhaps a dog or a cat, get in some extra snuggles and petting time. It'll benefit all creatures involved. Read more about why petting a dog is therapeutic at Cuteness.

Also…

Distract Yourself

Whether you just want to look at art, or super cute animals, or check out a new exercise class, sometimes having a distraction is nice. We're sure you'll find this list of virtual experiences very helpful.

Feeling Lonely?

Here are some helpful ways to combat loneliness at home. Hang in there.


Laurie Gunning Grossman, Hunker’s editorial director, caught the California boho minimalist bug. So, she bought a cream-colored couch. And she also lives with two kids and two dogs, so we’ll see how that decision pans out.

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