What Can I Use to Cut ClosetMaid Shelves?

ClosetMaid is a registered trademark for a brand of home storage systems that employ wire construction. Anyone with basic do-it-yourself skills can install these specially designed units, shelving and hangers in rooms, basements, garages and home offices.

Construction

ClosetMaid shelves are made of heavy gauge steel wire. Wire shelving is more durable and efficient than wood. The rigid steel is capable of holding weight for a long time without sagging. The crossbar design allows for easy care as dust won't accumulate on the shelves. Stored items receive additional protection from wire shelves, as they provide adequate airflow to prevent the growth of mold and mildew.

The thicker crossbars of the steel wire are placed farther apart for applications in the garage or basement where most items stored are larger or in boxes. Tighter placement of thinner wires creates a mesh surface for kitchen or bathroom shelving. Mesh construction is more practical for holding smaller individual items placed directly on the shelf.

Cutting ClosetMaid

A hacksaw and bolt cutter are the cutting tools recommended by the ClosetMaid company. Both items are simple hand tools that can be used by anyone with average hand strength.

Hacksaws are lightweight saws with blades for cutting metal. Bolt cutters have two long handles designed to leverage force for making cuts through metal rods.

Power Tools

Hand tools are suitable for cutting one or two shelves, but if you have a large number of shelves to alter, power tools speed up the job and reduce hand strain. All power saws, including jig saws, band saws, chop saws and circular saws, have blade options suitable for cutting metal.

Hand held rotary tools use bit style attachments and can be fitted with metal cutting implements. Pneumatic cutters are similar to bolt cutters, except that they use air pressure to exert cutting force.

Tips

If you prefer not to cut the shelves yourself, your local ClosetMaid retailer can cut the shelves for you.

Warnings

Always wear safety glasses when cutting metal.


Cynthia Clark

Cynthia Clark began writing professionally in 2004. Her work experience includes all areas of small-business development, real-estate investments, home remodeling and Web development. Clark is skilled in a number of design disciplines from digital graphics to interior design. Her diverse background and commonsense problem-solving skills allow her to tackle a variety of topics as an online writer.