How to Flush a Partially Clogged Toilet

If your toilet is backing up because of a clog, there is a good chance it is only partially clogged. When the water level in a toilet rises and will not flush properly, the level will usually get lower over time. This is because some water is able to seep through the partial clog in the toilet's colon. Flushing the toilet and clearing this partial clog can be done with the proper approach. Your toilet will be back to normal in moments.

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Get your plunger ready to remove a partial clog.

Step 1

If your toilet is backing up because of a clog, there is a good chance it is only partially clogged. When the water level in a toilet rises and will not flush properly, the level will usually get lower over time. This is because some water is able to seep through the partial clog in the toilet's colon. Flushing the toilet and clearing this partial clog can be done with the proper approach. Your toilet will be back to normal in moments.

Step 2

Look behind the toilet and find the silver shutoff valve connected to the toilet. This is the valve that controls whether water can flow into the toilet's tank or not. For your purposes, you will not want more water coming in. That is what the bucket is for, and shutting off the water will likely prevent overflow following the flush.

Step 3

Flush the toilet to empty the tank and watch the water level. Since the clog is still in place, the water level will rise, but new water will not fill the bowl. The partial clog will eventually allow the water to seep through. Wait until the water level has drained down to the bottom of the bowl. If you do not have the time to wait or are short on patience, you can always get another bucket and bail out the water from the bowl manually and pour it in the tub or another properly functioning toilet. This could be a messy proposition, though.

Step 4

Grab your plunger and fit the end of the cup over the hole in the bottom of the toilet. As an option, you can add a layer of petroleum jelly to the rim of the plunger's cup to help it make a better seal. Once the seal is formed and the plunger is in place, work the handle of the plunger quickly up and down to force air and water through the pipes to dislodge the clog. After 10 to 15 seconds of plunging, pull the plunger out of the bowl.

Step 5

Pour the bucket of water into the toilet immediately following the removal of the plunger. The weight of the water will cause the toilet to flush immediately, and assuming you dislodged the clog it should go down quickly into the drainpipes. Continue pouring the water into the toilet as fast as you can without causing an overflow. The heat of the water combined with the pressure caused by its weight should flush out the debris completely.