This Extremely Popular Trader Joe's Holiday Decoration Is BACK

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One of the best parts about shopping at Trader Joe's is seeing all of the seasonal plants and decor they have available right when you walk into a store. And now that Thanksgiving is approaching in a few days, the grocery store brand seems to be getting a head start on its December holiday goodies. In other words, Grump Trees are back!

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According to @traderjoesobsessed on Instagram, Trader Joe's has brought back the customer-favorite Grump Trees, which are inspired by the greenery in ‌Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas.‌ Essentially, they look like yellow-green trees that are slightly drooping over because of the single ornament hung right at the top of the plant. They are also wrapped with a red ribbon and placed in a red burlap bag.

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Based on @traderjoesobsessed's post, the Grump Trees are priced at $9.99 — but, of course, this price could vary based on your location. If you're interested in getting one for yourself, we recommend giving your local Trader Joe's store a call before heading over (you can find the phone number here).

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What are Grump Trees?

Grump Trees are lemon cypress trees, which are native to California and give off a lovely lemon scent. The term "Grump Tree" is just a fun nickname for the holidays. But rather than getting rid of your mini tree after the season is over, we recommend keeping them — just remove the ribbon and ornament. You can even plant your Grump Tree outside, where it can grow up to 30 feet tall, but make sure to do so once there is no frost on the ground.

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How to care for a Grump Tree or lemon cypress tree:

Lemon cypress trees like lots of light and a humid climate, so giving this tree a spot by your window is ideal. Once the soil in your Grump Tree's pot is dry to the touch, you'll want to give it a good watering. Like with most plants, make sure that you don't overwater the tree. Drainage holes in the plant's pot can help with this.

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