How to Remove Stains From a Nylon Windbreaker

Nylon was introduced to the consumer market around 1938 and quickly became the fabric of choice for making women's nylon stockings. E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company spent 10 years researching the material before having success with using the fabric for hosiery yarn. Today nylon is used not only to make stockings, but also to make surgical sutures, rope, mosquito netting and a variety of other products. Nylon is commonly used to make windbreakers because it is lightweight and water resistant. Nylon is not stain resistant, but there is a method to remove stains from a nylon windbreaker.

Step 1

Lay your windbreaker on a flat surface, such as a kitchen or dining room table, with the stain facing up. Smooth out the material around the stain with your hands so that the nylon is not all wrinkled around the stained portion of the jacket.

Step 2

Pour ½ cup non-chlorine bleach into a small bowl. Dip a clean, soft cloth into the bleach, and clean the stain with the cloth. Clean in a circular motion, but try not to scrub too hard or the nylon will begin to pull up.

Step 3

Spray the stain with a pre-laundering stain remover; any brand is fine.

Step 4

Place the windbreaker in a mesh lingerie bag.

Step 5

Place the mesh bag containing the windbreaker into the washing machine. Put in ¼ cup all-purpose laundry detergent. Set the washer on a gentle cycle; wash the nylon windbreaker in cold water. Add a capful of fabric softener to the washer during the rinse cycle. According to Howtocleanstuff.net, if you add fabric softener to the rinse cycle, it will reduce the static that nylon often receives when you wash it.

Step 6

Remove the mesh bag containing the windbreaker from the washer, and place the bag in the dryer. Turn your dryer on the lowest setting. Add a dryer sheet to further help reduce static.

Step 7

Remove the nylon windbreaker from the dryer and from the mesh bag. The stain should be gone.


J. Taylor Ludwig

J. Taylor Ludwig holds a B.A. in business management and an M.A in media communications. She has worked as an investigative journalist and spent several years in the banking industry. Ludwig has been writing for more than 20 years and has published two nonfiction books.