How to Buff out a Chip in Silestone

Hunker may earn compensation through affiliate links in this story.
You can easily fix a chip in silestone.
Image Credit: Westend61/Westend61/GettyImages
See More Photos

Silestone isn't a special kind of rock but is actually the brand name found on some quartz countertops. Because this stone is made from layers of quartz and man-made resin, Silestone is quite durable and available in over 60 colors. making it a popular countertop choice. Although Silestone is pretty tough, the edges of the counter can chip if hit hard enough by a dropped pan or another object. Happily, you can likely repair a small chip or ding yourself.

Advertisement

Video of the Day

Picking the Right Resin

If you still have the chip that came out of your countertop, you can use a clear drying super glue to put the chip back in place and then scrape away any excess glue. Most of the time, however, the counter chip is long gone, which means you'll have to fill the gap with epoxy. You have two choices when doing so.

Advertisement

One is to purchase a tinted quartz countertop and try to match the epoxy color to your counter. This can hide the repair, unless you get a color that is too from those found in your counter. The wrong color will make your repair stick out like a sore thumb. It's generally best to get a clear epoxy so you don't need to worry about color-matching.

Advertisement

Things You'll Need

How to Buff out a Chip in Silestone

1. Prepare the Countertop

Proper preparation of the countertop surface before a repair is important. Your epoxy won't adequately adhere to a dirty surface, which means your repair isn't likely to last long. It's also more likely to be noticeable.

Advertisement

  1. Check your warranty. Silestone warrants their countertops for 10 to 25 years, so make sure you can't get a professional repair for free before you start your own repair.
  2. Remove any clutter or other items away from your work area.
  3. Wash the chipped area of the countertop with warm soapy water and allow it to dry.
  4. Lay masking tape around the chip. This will help you keep your epoxy off the rest of your counter, allowing you to get it only where it needs to go.

Advertisement

2. Fill the Chip

Although the basic premise is the same, not all epoxies are identical. The general epoxy guidelines found on the internet are just that — general directions. If the label on your specific countertop repair kit says something different, follow those instructions rather than more general advice.

Advertisement

  1. Prepare the epoxy as per the repair kit instructions if necessary. Epoxy often comes in two parts that you must activate by mixing them together.
  2. Squeeze the epoxy into the chip, filling it completely.
  3. When the chip is full, use a plastic scraper or another straight edge to smooth it out evenly over the exposed portion of the countertop.
  4. Spray the area with a hardening spray if required by your repair kit.
  5. Leave the area sit for 24 hours to let the epoxy harden.

Advertisement

3. Sand and Buff the Countertop

When the epoxy is dry, inspect it carefully. Sometimes epoxy shrinks a bit as it sets, so you need to make sure the chip void is still completely full. If it isn't, you'll need to apply more epoxy and allow it to dry again. Once you have, you're ready to sand and polish.

  1. Scrape away any large globs of epoxy with a razor blade so you have less to sand. Hold the razor blade at a 45-degree angle and slide it straight across the surface. Do not apply too much pressure as you don't want to gouge the epoxy or scratch the countertop.
  2. Sand the area with fine sandpaper until it is perfectly smooth. You want something around a 400 to 600 grit.
  3. Wipe away or vacuum up any sanding debris and then buff the countertop with a soft rag and some stone polish.

Warning

Many websites will tell you to buff your Silestone with steel wool after repairing a chip. Do not do so. Steel wool is very abrasive and can scratch the Silestone.

Advertisement