An LG dryer must produce heat to dry clothes. If the dryer is not blowing heat, you need to find out why. Something is likely interfering with the heat source or related components that control airflow. Consequently, if the dryer is functioning at all, clothes probably still remain wet after the dry cycle ends. Once you identify the problem, you can take steps to address it.

Burned out Heating Element

Your electric LG dryer's heating element is simply a long strand of coiled metal that's energized by electricity to discharge heat. As air blows over the coils, it becomes hot and then is forced into the drum. The heating element can short circuit, and when this happens, the dryer can't blow heat into the drum. Use an ohm meter -- a device that measures electricity volts -- to test the component's electrical connection. If no continuity is detected, the heating element is defective. Contact a dryer repair technician to trade the damaged component for a new one. You can't fix a heating element once it burns out.

Blown Safety Fuse

Each LG dryer has a safety fuse that activates when the temperature in the drum reaches dangerous levels that could cause the appliance to overheat. Once the fuse blows, the dryer loses either all or some of its function. In most cases, a blown safety fuse impacts a dryer's ability to supply heat. Full function of your dryer won't be reestablished until you swap out the bad fuse with a good one.

Broken or Constrained Blower Wheel

Your LG dryer has a small plastic wheel that pushes air through the dryer. If it fails, your dryer won't blow air into the drum cavity, and you might hear a squeaking sound when the dryer is on from the wheel attempting to turn despite its malfunction. Lint can prevent the wheel from rotating and pushing air, which also impacts airflow. Refer to your dryer manual for assistance finding the blower wheel. Clean it free of lint. If after cleaning it, the problem isn't resolved, wheel replacement is required.

Excess Lint

Lint can wreak havoc on an LG dryer and reduce its performance when it's allowed to accumulate in the exhaust system. A buildup of lint can restrict airflow in a dryer so that no or little air enters the drum. Clean your lint trap after each use. Regularly vacuum out lint in the exhaust duct, and manually remove lint caught in the outside vent on your home's exterior to restore airflow.