How to Put Ribbon Garland on a Christmas Tree

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A ribbon garland can serve as the perfect solution to concealing those bare spots on your Christmas tree, while also adding a touch of color and texture. While there are no set rules to placing ribbon garland, positioning it incorrectly can make your tree look too busy. Follow these steps for a gorgeous design. (Also, don't miss this info on 5 easy hacks to help keep your Christmas tree fresh!)

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Things You'll Need

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Tip: Using ribbons of varying size and shape will add interest and texture to your tree.

Step 1

If you're using an artificial tree, assemble the tree according to the manufacturer's instructions, and "fluff" each branch to fill out any gaps.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 2

If your tree is not pre-lit, string lights around the tree.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 3

Cut some garland into several 1-foot pieces. Gather any other faux greenery you might want to use. These will serve as fillers in the tree and help fill in any gaps.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 4

Insert garland and greenery to cover noticeable gaps.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Tip: Each time after inserting a few pieces of garland and/or greenery, step away from the tree to ensure you are "filling" the tree evenly, and assess where the remaining gaps may be.

Step 5

Cut several 6-inch pieces of green chenille.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 6

Wrap the end of your ribbon with a chenille stem, leaving some excess chenille open at the ends (which will serve to anchor to the tree).

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 7

Continue tying the chenille stems approximately 1 1/2 feet apart along the ribbon.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Tip: Feel free to cut your ribbon every 6 feet or so to make wrapping it around the tree a little easier and more manageable.

Step 8

Starting at the very top of the tree, tie the end of the ribbon to the back of the tree by twisting the excess chenille stem around a branch.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 9

Bring the ribbon around and tie the next chenille stem onto a branch of the tree.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 10

Keep going around and tie the third chenille stem to the side of the tree. Allow the ribbon to hang a bit loosely in between each tie as opposed to being pulled taut.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Tip: You can also use the tree branches to secure the ribbon onto the tree as pictured below.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 11

Continue the tree wrapping process in a zigzag manner, leaving even spaces in between layers.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 12

Once your ribbon runs out, tie a second ribbon to the back of the tree (as outlined in Step 8).

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 13

Continue wrapping and tying ribbon, leaving even spaces in between layers.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 14

Proceed all the way to the bottom of the tree, making the loops of the ribbon a little looser towards the bottom, and following the triangular shape of the tree.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 15

For a little more interest, use a different size and shape of ribbon. Tie a chenille stem to the end.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 16

Loosely wrap the second type of ribbon around the tree in alternating rows, allowing organic movement.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 17

Sort ornaments from smallest to largest and lightest to heaviest.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 18

Starting at the top of the tree, begin placing your small/light ornaments, followed by medium and then largest/heaviest as you proceed down the tree. Add any interesting and unusually shaped ornaments last.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 19

To make the topper, tie a simple bow with your main ribbon and thread a piece of green chenille to the back of the bow.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 20

Attach the bow to the very top of the tree.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Step 21

Tuck the excess ribbon from the bow into the sides of the tree, ensuring you do not alter the shape of the tree.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Stand back and adjust any ornaments or ribbon as you see fit, and enjoy the magical glow of your newly decorated Christmas tree.

Image Credit: Lucy Akins

Lucy Akins is an artist, photographer, blogger, and speaker living in Toronto, Ontario. Her work has been published in several magazines, including: Cottages and Bungalows, American Farmlife Style, National Geographic Kids, Better Homes and Gardens, and more. Lucy enjoys sharing her passion for watercolor, decorating and creating as she believes there is an artist in all of us. When not creating, Lucy can be found enjoying time with her husband, their three children and their energetic Aussie pup, Brody.

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