Step Inside a Renovated 1850s Home in Posh Paris

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Looking at this 19th-century home located in Paris's 17th arrondissement and renovated by architect Pierre-Louis Gerlier, it's hard to imagine that it was once dark and deteriorated. When its owners, a newly married couple, found the property they knew it could be a perfect family home, so they brought in Gerlier — who is no stranger to transforming tricky spaces — to give it a complete reorganization. But first they needed to turn back time a bit, repairing damaged floors, restoring the facade, and reinforcing beams that had been eaten by insects.

Once the structural work was complete, Gerlier worked on creating a family-friendly layout. He turned the lower level into a dedicated children's floor with two bedrooms, a bathroom, and a laundry area, and the top floor became a suite for the parents. The main floor is now the primary living space, which was opened up by removing a wall between the living and dining rooms. The level is arranged around a central staircase, which Gerlier framed with rounded cabinets, adding storage in each of the spaces.

While the architectural details go a long way towards making the home feel modern, it's the colorful accents that bring it to life. Gerlier used off-white as the primary color, but added in a bright hue on each floor, including a sunny yellow in the children's bath and a grassy green in the parents bedroom. By combining custom elements, vivid details, and lively patterns, Gerlier has helped this 1850s family home reach its full potential.

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Living Room

Gerlier added green built-in bookcases to frame the new fireplace in the living room, and a new front door complements the existing windows and brings in more light.

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Dining Room

Gerlier took inspiration from art deco design, adding details such as the crown molding and rounded cabinets.

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Kitchen

The kitchen — once stuffed with appliances and shelves — was streamlined with smart storage that flows into the dining room.

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Bedroom

Gerlier left the beams exposed in the parents' bedroom to showcase the history of the home. "We have respected and highlighted everything that made this house unique," he says.

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Bathroom

Green Moroccan cement tiles line the walls and shower in the master bathroom, which Gerlier created by combining a small bedroom and bath.

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Bathroom

A soaking tub sits below a loft space in the master bath.

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Bedroom

Gerlier kept the lower level bright by painting the walls in a crisp white, with a mustard yellow blocking accent.


Elizabeth Stamp is a freelance writer in Los Angeles. Her work has appeared in Architectural Digest, Elle Decor, and CNN Style.

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