The Best Pizza Ovens for Every Type of Home (and Budget)

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Hotdogs and hamburgers are certainly beloved all-American foods, but there's only one combination dinner/snack that truly wears the crown of America's favorite meal: Pizza. And while we'll gladly accept takeout and artisanal restaurants, there's nothing quite like making your own from scratch, right in the comfort of your own home.

To assemble your own pizza and expect it to come out with any semblance of the real thing, one ingredient rises above all others: Heat. New York pizzerias are still the gold standard (sorry, Chicago) not just because of their thin crust, flavorful sauce, and rich mozzarella, but because their classic pizza ovens can often reach as high as 800 degrees. So if you want to make your own pizza at home, your standard oven won't do. You need a special pizza oven designed to get as hot as possible.

We rounded up the five top-reviewed pizza ovens so you can decide which one will work best for you. Some are outdoor ovens, some are indoor, but all share one very important thing: They are highly endorsed by the customers who bought them.

Scroll down to see the very best pizza ovens for your home.

Best Wood-Fired Pizza Oven

Slightly squat and angular, the Ooni has a tall stovepipe chimney sticking out of the top, which gives it a very Old World sort of vibe. Running exclusively off wood pellets, this oven is for lovers of wood-fired pizza. It weighs a relatively light 22 pounds and is about 8.6 inches wide by 14 inches long. It stands 25 inches high, including the distinctive chimney. Ooni thoughtfully gave this oven a tripod design: Three short legs make it ultra-stable on a variety of surfaces since it doesn't need to land squarely on four feet.

It can make pizzas up to about 13 inches across, and the stove reaches a toasty 930 degrees in just 10 minutes, thanks no doubt to the 430-grade stainless steel construction with internal ceramic insulation. It comes with a door that completely encloses the oven after the pizza has been placed on the stone.

Best Portable Pizza Oven

Quality outdoor pizza ovens probably don't come much more affordable than this. While this model costs about the same as a few trips to your local pizzeria, it makes pizzas up to about 14-inches wide at about 700 degrees. Not quite 900 degrees, but significantly hotter than the oven in your kitchen can muster.

It operates on a standard 20-pound propane tank, and comes with the hose needed to get up and running right away. This squat, round oven stands about a foot high and 18 inches in diameter and is open in front (where you'll also find the bright red propane control knob) for sliding your pies in and out. Pizzacraft explains that the domed shape of the oven is designed to reflect heat back down on the pizza for more even baking. A thermometer is built into the top of the dome for easy reference. Since it weighs 26 pounds, this oven is fairly portable; pack it and a standard propane tank in the back of your car for a camping trip, and Pizzacraft says you can make more than 200 pizzas.

Best Budget Buy

Perhaps the weirdest-looking pizza oven you'll ever find, the Presto 03430 Pizzazz Plus Rotating Oven looks like a cross between an iron and a lazy Susan. Designed as an indoor pizza oven that sits on your kitchen counter, you place the pizza on the circular tray that turns between a pair of over and under heating elements, ensuring a consistent bake. It's perfect for those who aren't looking for a big commitment — it can be tucked away when not in use and clocks in at under $50.

Though adorned with thousands of positive online reviews, it doesn't look much like a traditional pizza oven, nor does it operate like one. The controller on top of the oven lets you control the upper and lower heating elements, and you dial it up on a scale of zero to 20, rather than selecting a specific temperature.

Presto doesn't specify how hot this oven gets, but it's likely no more than about 400 or 450 degrees, and it measures about 15.8 by 14.5 inches, stands 10 inches high, and can make pizza up to about 12 inches in diameter. One big advantage: You don't need to peek into a cave-like oven to check on the progress of your pizza. You can clearly see exactly how it's baking every step of the way.

Best Overall

Camp Chef says its Italia Artisan Pizza Oven is modeled after traditional wood-fired brick ovens and captures the same baking experience without the wood. This is a gas-fueled oven, and you can connect a full-sized propane tank with the included five-foot hose, or mount a small portable tank right to the side of the oven. Armed with the portable propane, you could conceivably travel with the Camp Chef oven, though it does weigh a hefty 36 pounds.

The stainless steel dome-topped oven is about 30 inches wide and 19 inches deep, and is open in front for loading and unloading your pizzas, though you can seal it off with a ventilated oven door. Camp Chef says it has double-walled construction and specially designed burners to replicate the wood-fired oven design and it reaches 750 degrees in about 15 minutes (which you can monitor from the top-mounted thermometer).

Best Hybrid Pizza Oven

While not a traditional pizza oven per se, Oster's Convection Oven with Dedicated Pizza Drawer is unique because of what's right in the name of the product — it's a standard countertop convection oven, but, like a dual oven, it has a pizza drawer down below that makes pizzas (homemade as well as frozen) up to 12 inches in diameter. The pizza door handles collapse into the front face of the pizza drawer when not in use, but pull out easily in just a moment when needed.

Of course, Oster's pizza drawer only reaches about 400 degrees, so don't expect beautifully charred homemade pizza crust. But the tradeoff is that you get a full-featured convection toaster oven and pizza drawer for one very affordable price and one relatively small footprint on your counter. It measures about 15.5 inches by 18 inches, and stands 10 inches high.


Dave Johnson writes in the Los Angeles sunshine after spending years in the Seattle rain and Jersey snow. He's a been a scuba instructor, drummer, and the author of about three dozen books. Fun fact: He once drag-raced against a hoverboard while riding a Segway. For science.

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