How to Hang a Wreath on a Door or Window

Hunker may earn compensation through affiliate links in this story.
Image Credit: solarisimages/iStock/GettyImages

The wreath is a perennial option for fall and winter outdoor decor, but it also poses a timeless question: Is there any way to hang it without making holes in the door or leaving tape residue on a window? Creative placement and a few clever creations make it a lot easier to hang the average wreath without visibly marring your woodwork or windows.

The Hidden Tack Method

A Christmas wreath is a classic holiday deocration.
Image Credit: onepony/iStock/GettyImages

Thumbtacks cleverly pressed into the top of the door or window frame offer a way to hang even a large wreath without making a hole in the door. This technique is best for a door that isn't opened regularly; otherwise, guests may have to duck to pass beneath the wreath. A decorative ribbon is the key to hanging the wreath at the desired height. Choose a ribbon that pairs well with the wreath—red or gold work well with an evergreen Christmas wreath, while orange, black or purple look great with some Halloween-themed wreaths.

Choose a ribbon up to 3 inches wide for a large wreath; narrower for a smaller one. Unwind enough ribbon to make a loop to hang the wreath at the chosen height, then cut it an inch or so longer, just in case. Loop the ribbon over the wreath frame so it hides among the greenery or decorative elements in the wreath. Press tacks through both ends of the ribbon loop at the top, into the door or window frame. Use two or three tacks to ensure the wreath is secure.

The Sneaky Hook Trick

Those temporary adhesive hooks that leave no residue behind offer another excellent way to hang a wreath on a door. The good news: You don't have to hang the hook on the front of the door, where others can see it. Hang the hook upside down on the inside-facing portion of the door, if the wreath is displayed on the outside-facing side. Cut a length of fishing line or ribbon long enough to loop around the wreath, over the top of the door, so it can be held in place by the hook. If using ribbon, make sure it is thin enough to still close the door completely.

This technique can also be used to hang a wreath in a window by placing the adhesive hook hook-end-up above the window frame. Use fishing line or ribbon to hold the wreath facing out if the display is meant to show its best side outdoors.

Windows, Wreaths, and Magnets

Magnets can suspend a wreath right on the surface of window glass.
Image Credit: baona/iStock/GettyImages

Believe it or not, magnets can be used to hang wreaths on single-pane windows. A set of two specially designed magnets is the key to making this work. Each decorative disc-shaped magnet has a hook at the bottom, perfect for hanging wreaths of up to 10 pounds. The matching magnet goes on the other side of the glass, opposite the first magnet, offering a place to hang yet another wreath or decorative accent. The lighter the wreaths, the better the chance these magnets will stay in place without sliding or falling off, so it's best not to use them on heavy wreaths or those with fragile decorative elements. Use floral wire or fishing line to secure each wreath to the hook on its respective magnet.

The Power of Suction

Suction hooks can also be used to hold a wreath on a window or on some completely smooth doors. The largest varieties claim to hold wreaths of up to 25 pounds, although it's best not to test the limits of the grip, opting instead for a lighter wreath. Thoroughly clean the glass or door surface with rubbing alcohol or vinegar and a lint-free cloth. Wet the inside of the suction cup with warm water, then press it onto the desired location. Let it sit for up to a full day before adding the wreath, as this ensures optimal suction.

Over-the-Door Hangers

Hangers the loop over the top of a door offer perhaps the most secure means of hanging a large wreath.
Image Credit: ChristopherBernard/iStock/GettyImages

An over-the-door wreath hanger offers one of the simplest ways to hang a wreath on an entry door without creating holes. The top hook on this hanger fits over the top of the door, while the bottom hook holds the wreath. Some versions are adjustable; some are highly decorative on their own, offering options such as monograms or elegant embossed detailing. Read the packaging carefully before selecting a hook to ensure it hangs low enough to match the size of the wreath. The larger the wreath, the longer the hook needs to be.

references

Kathy Adams is an award-winning writer. She is an avid DIYer that is equally at home repurposing random objects into new, useful creations as she is at supporting community gardening efforts and writing about healthy alternatives to household chemicals. She's written numerous DIY articles for paint and decor companies, as well as for Black + Decker, Hunker, SFGate, Landlordology and others.

View Work