This DIY Waxed Canvas Holder for Your Holiday Tree Can Actually Be Used Year-Round

waxed canvas tabletop christmas tree stand
credit: Trisha Sprouse

If you happen to be short on space, a tabletop Christmas tree can be a smart solution during the holidays. And luckily you don't have to skimp on style. This DIY fabric planter upgrades a basic pot or tree with minimalist Scandinavian charm, while the waxed canvas and leather handles add a rugged, outdoorsy feel. By waxing the canvas, you'll bring out the beautiful texture of the fabric, as well as create a water-resistant holder for your tree. The best part is that you can use the fabric planter for your indoor greenery long after the holidays are over.

Things You'll Need

DIY waxed canvas Christmas tree stand
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 1

Measure the height of the pot in which your tree is planted.

Measuring height of planter pot
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 2

Cut a piece of canvas fabric that is at least two times by four times the height of your planter pot. For example, if your pot is six inches high (as seen in this project), cut your fabric to at least 12 inches by 24 inches. You can cut it larger than these dimensions to create a taller and wider canvas planter; just don't cut it smaller, or your pot won't fit inside.

Canvas fabric cut to size
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 3

Fold the longer side of the fabric in half and sew along the bottom and open side with a 1/4-inch seam allowance. Leave the top open.

Canvas fabric folded in half with guidelines marked for sewing
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 4

Place your hands inside the bag and push up one of the corners to form it into a triangle.

Folding corner into triangle
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 5

Measure one to two inches down from the tip of the triangle and sew a straight line across the triangle. Note: The farther down from the tip of the triangle you sew, the wider the base of the canvas planter will be.

Guideline showing where to sew along folded corner
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 6

Cut off the excess fabric on the tip of the triangle (above the line you just sewed). Repeat the same process with the other corner. Doing this will create a canvas bag with "boxed corners" that can sit up versus a bag that lays flat.

Cutting off excess fabric from corner
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 7

Flatten the corners back out, and use a lint roller to remove any dust or lint from both sides of the canvas bag.

Lint rolling over fabric to remove dust or lint
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 8

Working in sections, rub the bar of fabric wax onto the canvas with quick back and forth motions to create friction. This will warm up the wax and make it easier to spread. You'll notice the color of the fabric change as you coat it with wax.

Rubbing bar of fabric wax onto fabric
credit: Trisha Sprouse

As you go, rub the wax into the canvas with your fingers to really work it into the fibers. Continue until you have coated both sides thoroughly.

Pressing wax into fabric with fingers
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Then turn the bag right side out, remove any lint with the lint roller, and coat both sides with wax using the same process.

Rubbing bar of fabric wax into canvas fabric
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 9

Once the inside and outside of the bag have been coated with wax, fold down the top of the bag twice to form a cuff, which will hide the raw edge.

Folding cuff at top of planter bag
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 10

Cut two strips of tooling leather or faux leather that are long enough to fold over the cuff of the bag to create a handle on each side.

Two strips of tooling leather
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 11

Fold one of the leather strips in half over the side of the canvas bag so that half of the strip is outside of the bag and the other half is inside the bag.

Folding strip of leather over side of fabric planter
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Use a leather hole punch to punch through both layers of the leather strip and the canvas.

Punching hole through leather strip
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 12

Slide a brass rivet post through the holes, and place a cap on the end of the rivet post (inside the bag).

Inserting brass rivet post through hole of leather strip
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Hammer the rivet together to secure the handle in place. Repeat on the other side with the other leather strip.

Hammering brass rivet closed
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Your waxed canvas tree stand is all ready for its holiday debut. Simply slide the potted tree into the canvas planter and break out the ornaments!

Waxed canvas Christmas tree stand
credit: Trisha Sprouse
Waxed canvas Christmas tree stand
credit: Trisha Sprouse
Waxed canvas Christmas tree stand
credit: Trisha Sprouse

Trisha Sprouse

Trisha Sprouse

Trisha is a writer, video producer + maker with a knack for creating modern DIY content. When her hands aren't covered in paint, she's most likely hol... more