How to Clean Burn Marks on a Bedspread

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Things You'll Need

  • Soft clean cloth

  • Iron

  • Hydrogen peroxide

  • Lemon

  • White vinegar

  • Borax

Tip

Test the bedspread for colorfastness in an inconspicuous piece of the fabric before using each method to remove the mark. Read the care instructions on the label carefully. Certain fabrics such as wool and silk can be damaged easily by using too much water.

Clean Burn Marks on a Bedspread

A burn mark can leave a noticeable unsightly mark on a bedspread that can be quite an eyesore. As long as the fabric is not burned all the way through, there is hope for salvaging it rather than having to buy a new one. There are several proven methods that can remove burn marks from bedspreads that only require a minimal amount of time and effort and can restore your bedspread.

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Step 1

Soak a piece of old clean fabric in hydrogen peroxide. A wash cloth will work fine. Wring it out thoroughly and place it on the burn mark. Iron over the wash cloth to remove the burn. Check periodically to see if it's gone and continue until there is no trace of it left. This method works particularly well on cotton.

Step 2

Soak the burned area in ice cold water for up to 24 hours, checking on it from time to time. Use a bowl with cold water and a few ice cubes and put the area of the bedspread that the burn is on into it. Check on it periodically to make see if it's gone.

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Step 3

Cut a lemon in half and rub it all over the burn mark. Set the bedspread outside so that the sunlight can help to get rid of the burn mark.

Step 4

Dip a clean cloth in white vinegar and rub the burn mark. Use a second clean cloth dipped in cold water and rub the area until the burn is gone.

Step 5

Mix 1 tablespoon of borax in a cup of warm water and sponge it gently onto the area wiping until the burn mark is no longer visible.

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Melynda Sorrels

Melynda Sorrels spent 10 years in the military working in different capacities of the medical field, including dental assisting, health services administration, decontamination and urgent medical care. Awarded the National Guardsman’s Medal for Lifesaving efforts in 2002, Sorrels was also a nominee for a Red Cross Award and a certified EMT-B for four years.