Removing the Bleach Smell From a Bed

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Whether the bleach odor on your bed is a result of too much bleach on the bed linens or a bit of bleach on the mattress itself, a good airing-out takes care of the problem. Bleach odor naturally dissipates on its own once the liquid dries, but you can speed it along by sprinkling baking soda over the bed, then vacuuming it up after 30 minutes or so.

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Freshening the Bed and Bedroom

Things You'll Need

  • Clothesline (optional)

  • Box fan or window fan

  • Baking soda

  • Vacuum cleaner with upholstery brush attachment

Step 1: Remove the Bed Linens

Remove the blankets, sheets and pillows from the bed. Remove the pillowcases from the pillows as well, if they smell of bleach.

Step 2: Air Out the Linens

Take the linens outside to air out, ideally on a clothesline, if they smell of bleach and have recently been cleaned.

Step 3: Open the Windows

Open all the windows in the bedroom. If the room has a ceiling fan, turn it on; if not, place a fan in one window to draw air out of the room. This helps remove bleach odor lingering in the room.

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Step 4: Take the Mattress Outdoors

Take the mattress outside, if possible, to air it out for a full day or as long as possible. A nonhumid day is best, as dry air helps remove moisture trapped in the bed. Direct sunlight for at least part of the day also helps dry out the mattress materials and remove odors. If unable to take the mattress outdoors, air it out near a window in direct sunlight for a full day.

Step 5: Give it a Baking Soda Treatment

Sprinkle baking soda over the side of the mattress you sleep on, or wherever you suspect the bleach odor is strongest. Wait an hour or longer, then vacuum the baking soda up using the upholstery brush attachment.

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references

Kathy Adams is an award-winning writer. She is an avid DIYer that is equally at home repurposing random objects into new, useful creations as she is at supporting community gardening efforts and writing about healthy alternatives to household chemicals. She's written numerous DIY articles for paint and decor companies, as well as for Black + Decker, Hunker, SFGate, Landlordology and others.