How to Get Stains Out of Cultured Marble

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Cultured marble -- a mix of marble powder and a polyester resin -- requires a gentle touch when it comes to cleaning. Avoid using abrasives, which may damage the surface. Instead, use a soft cloth and liquid-based stain removers such as vinegar or a mild soap and water to treat many kinds of stains.

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Try the Simplest First

Wipe the stained area with a mild dish soap or gentle, nonabrasive cleaner -- in some cases this may be enough to remove fresh stains or substances that have potential to stain if left on the cultured marble. Wipe the area with a damp cloth afterward to remove soap residue.

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Hard-Water, Rust and Brown Spots

Vinegar does the trick when it comes to removing hard-water stains, rust and brown spots -- all caused by forms of mineral deposits. Vinegar eats away at the materials, much like commercial products designed to remove calcium, lime and rust.

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Things You'll Need

  • White vinegar

  • Spray bottle

  • Sponge or soft cloth

Step 1

Mix equal parts white vinegar and water in a spray bottle.

Step 2

Spray the spots with the vinegar solution, allowing the liquid to sit for 30 minutes or longer.

Step 3

Wipe the sprayed areas with a damp sponge or cloth to rinse the cultured marble.

Step 4

Reapply the vinegar treatment if water spots remain, or spray undiluted vinegar over them. Wipe the area with a wet cloth or sponge after 30 minutes.

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Stains from Hairspray and Sticky Substances

Remove sticky materials such as hairspray or tar by dabbing the spot with a cotton swab soaked in rubbing alcohol. While alcohol generally will not damage the finish, test an inconspicuous area first to be sure. Cultured marble's stain-resistant properties vary depending upon the manufacturer, the condition of the surface and the type of finish coating the material.

Tip

If the cultured marble loses its shine after stain removal or after years of cleaning, rub an automotive polishing or buffing compound over it with a soft cloth, then wipe the residue away with another soft cloth.

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references

Kathy Adams is an award-winning writer. She is an avid DIYer that is equally at home repurposing random objects into new, useful creations as she is at supporting community gardening efforts and writing about healthy alternatives to household chemicals. She's written numerous DIY articles for paint and decor companies, as well as for Black + Decker, Hunker, SFGate, Landlordology and others.