Where Is the Thermal Fuse Located in a GE Dryer?

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One of America's leading brands of home appliances, GE has gained a reputation for producing award-winning, long-lasting dryers. If, after many years of service, your GE dryer suddenly stops producing heat, it may not be time to start shopping for a new one just yet. Chances are, your problem is a blown thermal fuse. In GE dryers, a thermal fuse is a safety device that is set to cut off the flow of electricity from the dryer's heating mechanisms if the dryer reaches a predetermined maximum temperature.

Locating the Thermal Fuse

In GE dryers, the thermal fuse--sometimes called a safety thermostat--is located behind the drum on the inside of the dryer. To access the thermal fuse you will need to open the dryer from the top. Though it may sound a bit daunting, opening the top of the dryer to reveal its inner workings is surprisingly simple. To open the dryer top you will need a flat-head screwdriver, putty knife or similar tool. Insert the screwdriver or putty knife underneath the dryer's top panel. Slide the putty knife along the bottom of the panel until you locate the two clips that hold it in place. These clips are usually located about four inches in from either side of the top dryer panel. Apply pressure to the clips to release them. Once the clips have been released, lift up the top panel and use the supports to keep it upright. Look inside the dryer, behind the drum, to find what looks like a round metal pan. This metal pan is actually the dryer's heating element housing. The thermal fuse will be located next to the heating element housing. Look for a white strip with two wires connected to it and you've located the thermal fuse in your GE dryer.

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Megan Mattingly-Arthur

Megan Mattingly-Arthur has been writing professionally since 1998. She has contributed to various publications, including "Teen Voices" and "Positive Teens" magazines, as well as a book, "The Young Writer's Guide to Getting Published." Mattingly-Arthur is studying travel and tourism through Penn Foster Career School.