How to Remagnetize an Electric Generator

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Things You'll Need

  • One-quarter or three-eighths electric drill

  • 1/4 inch threaded rod

  • Battery-powered drill

A generator without magnetism in the field windings needs a current applied.

Electric generators may lose their ability to generate electricity if the field windings become demagnetized. You can remedy this by using an electric motor as a generator. If you turn an electric motor using another motor or engine, the motor will generate electricity. Using this principle, you can plug an electric motor into a generator, start the generator and then turn the motor to generate an electric current. The current "flashes" the field windings in the generator and remagnetizes them.

Step 1

Stop the generator motor if it is running. Open the chuck on the battery drill and insert the 1/4-inch threaded rod. Tighten the chuck. Open the chuck on the electric drill and insert the other end of the rod, then tighten the chuck.

Step 2

Plug the electric drill into the generator outlet. Set the electric drill direction switch to forward and the battery drill direction switch to reverse.

Step 3

Start the generator engine and allow it time to warm up. The engine should run smoothly with the choke in the off position.

Step 4

Ask a second person to hold the battery drill while you hold the electric drill. Both persons should hold their drill firmly with both hands. Squeeze the trigger on the battery drill and the electric drill. As the battery drill spins the electric drill, the electric drill will generate current and flash the field windings on the generator.

Step 5

Release the trigger on the electric drill and on the battery drill when you feel sudden resistance. The generator is now generating electricity, and the electric drill motor is attempting to turn in the forward direction while the battery drill is turning it in the reverse direction.

Tip

Some generators have two sets of windings and both windings may require flashing separately. If flashing the generator through one outlet works only for that outlet and not the other, then repeat the process for the outlet that does not work.

Warning

Electric drills larger than three-eighths inch are capable of high torques. They will work for this process, but be aware they can twist suddenly when the generator begins working.

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Michael Logan

Michael Logan is a writer, editor and web page designer. His professional background includes electrical, computer and test engineering, real estate investment, network engineering and management, programming and remodeling company owner. Logan has been writing professionally since he was first published in "Test & Measurement World" in 1989.