How to Grow Avocados in Georgia

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Things You'll Need

  • Shovel

  • Nitrogen based fertilizer

  • Mulch

  • Large tarp

  • Incandescent lights

Avocados trees can not survive deep freezes without special care.

Growing an avocado tree in Georgia may prove challenging for even the most experienced gardener. Avocado trees fall under USDA plant hardiness zone 10, which means they do not tolerate any frost. Georgia is in USDA plant hardiness zone 7 and does occasionally experience frost and deep freezes. However, taking steps to protect the plant during the coldest months may ensure that it will survive the winter.

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Step 1

Choose a location for planting that receives a lot of sun. Any area that faces south on your land will usually feel warmer. The site that you choose should be at least 10 feet away from any structure so as to accommodate growth.

Step 2

Dig a hole using a shovel to the depth of the soil line mark on the tree with a diameter about two times as wide as the root ball. The root ball should extend out over the top of the hole by roughly 1 inch.

Step 3

Fill the hole up with soil, and water thoroughly.

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Step 4

Fertilize with 1 tablespoon of nitrogen-based fertilizer in the fall and winter months during the first year of growth. More fertilizer should be added as the tree matures.

Step 5

Place mulch around the base regularly during the first few years of growth. This will keep weeds away from the tree.

Step 6

Stay informed of the weather. The forecast of a frost or freeze means that you have to protect the tree. Add extra soil around the base of the tree and cover it with a large tarp anchored to the ground. Incandescent lights placed under the tarp will help to save the leaves. Extra watering should be done for two or three days before the cold weather hits.

Tip

Check the tree regularly for pests and disease. Periodically remove any fruit or limbs that look infected. To find out if avocados are ready for harvesting, cut one off the tree. If the fruit softens but doesn't shrivel, it is ready.

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references

Anna Thurman

Anna Thurman began her freelance writing career in 2009, writing for eHow. She attended Appalachian Technical College, where she studied business English.