Just a Few Wildly Expensive 1stDibs Items

Hunker may earn compensation through affiliate links in this story.

What if we told you that you can own a lock of Marilyn Monroe's hair? Or that you can purchase a pre-fabricated gas station designed in France in the 1960s? You'd probably think that your friends over at Hunker had lost their noodles. But here's the thing: Thanks to the online marketplace for beautiful and rare objects, 1stDibs, these items really are available! Albeit for a pretty penny.

Advertisement

1stDibs offers anyone who's willing to shell out some cash the opportunity to own highly collectible, one-of-a-kind memorabilia, artworks, and other coveted items. Sure, most of us will be priced out by their offerings, but it's still enthralling to see what's out there for when we make our millions.

Here are six of some of the coolest and priciest listings that are up for grabs on 1stDibs right now.

Advertisement

The words "icon" and "iconic" are perhaps thrown around a bit too liberally these days, but there's no denying that Marilyn Monroe is, in fact, a bonafide icon, and her serenading of President John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden with a sultry rendition of "Happy Birthday, Mr. President" was inarguably iconic.

Advertisement

It was the evening of May 19, 1962, and Monroe stood in front of a vast crowd, wearing a virtually see-through dress that was so tight she had to be sewn into it, sexily singing a breathy birthday tribute to JFK.

So where does this lock of her hair come into play? Like all Hollywood starlets, Monroe was sure to bring her personal hairdresser, Robert Champion, to the event to touch up her make-up and hair before she went out on stage. Champion had snipped this golden lock of Monroe's mane moments prior to a performance that would go down in history (and to some, infamy). The ringlet has been in Champion's personal collection ever since.

Advertisement

The lock measures approximately 2.57 inches by 1.18 inches, and is accompanied by a Polaroid of a beaming Monroe, snapped at an after party.

Check out the full 1stDibs listing here.

In the 21st century, most of us take accurate time-keeping for granted. But back in the day, keeping uniform time across various locations took ingenious inventions such as this 22-module time tower from Patek Philippe in 1971. As part of the Patek Philippe Electronic Clock System, Philippe crafted this module-style time tower system for the Parliament Building in Bern, Switzerland, enabling time synchronization in multiple locations for their day-to-day operations. The tower is composed of 65 individual analog dials that measure hours, minutes, and seconds.

Advertisement

Philippe created just a few of these unique time towers for the likes of airports, hospitals, radio stations, and office buildings where time precision was imperative. Since they were crafted via commissions, no pair is exactly the same.

Check out the listing here.

Advertisement

This collectible Catalin mono-phone telephone is a beacon of art deco design from the 1930s. The phone remains in working condition while containing all of its original parts, only upgraded with a new cord to fit a modern-day wall jack. With a cream colored facade and chrome accents, this unique piece is the perfect antidote to whatever version of the iPhone Apple tries to convince us we need next.

Advertisement

Check out the listing here.

Jean Prouvé was a pioneering, 20th-century French architect, designer, and metal worker who was commissioned to create this prefabricated gas station for Total oil company in the late 1960s. Prouvé's design exemplifies his affinity for structures that were light, modular and adaptable, which allowed for 100 of these filling stations to be erected throughout France in less than three years, according to Galerie Patrick Seguin. Thanks to Prouvé's masterful design, one structure only took four erectors and four days to become operational, according to Metalocus.

Advertisement

While the intention was for the gas stations to last up to 10 years, a few remain intact to this day.

Check out the full listing here.

Looking for a unique way to store your record collection? This 1stDibs seller has you covered with a funky, sculptural vinyl cabinet by multimedia artist Brother Mel Meyer from 1978. Composed of steel and stained concrete, this brutalist design is the ultimate conversation piece.

As a Marianist monk, Brother Mel Meyer started off as an art teacher in Texas before heading out to a territory in Europe where he traipsed about on nothing more than a motorized scooter. Along his travels, he was selected to work with acclaimed artists "Yoki" Aebischer in Switzerland and Jacques Le Chaveiller in France, before returning to the states where he settled in Missouri, converting an old farmhouse into his studio and showroom.

Get a closer look at this unique piece here.

This contemporary console table features an art deco-style design, handcrafted in Portugal by the luxury furniture manufacturer Greenapple. The console is wooden, with the main structure lacquered in satin black and the table top composed of polished Sahara Noir marble. Meanwhile, the metal base is finished in a high-gloss champagne bronze powder for an elegant flair.

Greenapple prioritizes fine craftsmanship within its in-house production facility. As such, they offer customization options for their pieces in terms of dimensions, finishes and materials.

This sleek console is sure to make any entryway sing. Learn more here.

Advertisement