DIY Planter That's Part Cottage Core Charm and Modern Decor

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Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

Looking to add a bit of greenery to your indoor or outdoor table? A moss trough centerpiece strikes just the right balance between cottage core charm and chic modern decor. Lush pillowy green moss piled inside a rustic stone planter — no wonder Restoration Hardware seems to feature them in just about every catalog and store display. While you can buy these super stylish centerpieces at RH (for a pretty penny), you can just as easily and more affordably make your own hypertufa version instead. All it takes are a few simple ingredients from your local home improvement store. The best part? No maintenance required.

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Things You'll Need

Step 1: Make a Mold

Find an empty cardboard box (Amazon deliveries, anyone?) that is the desired width and length of your trough. Use a box cutter or utility knife to cut down the sides to the height you prefer. We cut ours down to a height of two inches.

Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 2: Line the Mold

Line the box with a plastic tarp or garbage bag and spray it generously with cooking spray.

Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 3: Prepare the Hypertufa Mixture

Put on a dust mask and rubber gloves. In a plastic bucket, pour in equal parts peat moss, Portland cement, and vermiculite/perlite.

Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

Add water, a little bit at a time, and mix the ingredients together until you have the consistency of cottage cheese. The mixture should stick together easily when formed into a ball and be fairly wet but not soupy.

Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 4: Press Hypertufa Mixture Into Mold

Start by packing the hypertufa mixture into the bottom of the mold, pressing it firmly down. You want to create a bottom layer that's approximately an inch thick.

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Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

Once the bottom is done, press the hypertufa mixture around the sides of the mold, again packing it in firmly. The sides should also be approximately an inch thick. Be sure to smooth the sides into the bottom layer to create a seamless trough.

Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 5: Let Dry for 48 Hours

Cover the hypertufa trough with a plastic tarp or garbage bag, place it in a shady spot out of direct sun, and let it dry for 48 hours.

Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 6: Scrub With a Wire Brush

After the hypertufa has dried for 48 hours, gently remove it from the mold. Scrub the entire trough with a wire brush to rough up the texture and give it more of a craggy limestone look.

Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 7: Let Dry for Two Weeks and Then Paint

Cover the hypertufa with a plastic tarp again, and let it dry completely for about two weeks. It will lighten in both color and weight as it dries. If a lighter stone color is desired once it's fully dry, simply water down some white paint, and paint the trough with a light coat.

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Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

Step 8: Plant the Moss

Once the paint is dry, arrange pillow moss as desired inside the planter.

Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

Place your new moss trough in the center of your indoor or outdoor table. Since the moss is preserved, it requires absolutely no watering. Huzzah!

Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse
Image Credit: Trisha Sprouse

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