14 Fun Ways to Hack IKEA's Lack Tables

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The Lack series is an IKEA standby if you're looking for budget and basic surface pieces — the collection is probably best known for its blocky coffee tables and side tables, which are beyond simple to assemble (a bonus for IKEA items!) and are really about as inexpensive as furniture can be (seriously, where else are you going to find end tables for $9.99 a piece?). That said, you can always make a good thing better. See how people upgrade their Lack items:

1. Add some adhesive wallpaper to create a patterned top.

2. Use the top of a Lack side table to create a hanging succulent garden, as seen in this genius creation by Craftberry Bush.

3. Attach a slightly wider wood plank top for a farmhouse-fab DIY.

4. Check out O'verlays for adhesive decorative trim.

5. Stagger the Lack wall shelves for an upscale/designer look.

6. Try a DIY inspired by Danish design duo IKON KØBENHAVN. You'd have to rig some tiled panels to the Lack table, but we bet it's doable.

7. Add some art deco flair. Let DIYer Mark Montano show you how.

8. Add wheels and a square wood top for an adaptable piece.

9. Turn the lack side table upside down, put on a pitched roof and voilà: outdoor doggie bed.

10. Not the prettiest hack, but surely one of the more useful: A Lack side table atop a regular table becomes an instant standing desk.

11. Create a full-on cat kingdom by stacking Lack side tables and wrapping the legs in scratch-friendly twine.

12. Create a Lego workstation for the kids by gluing on flat Lego bases to the top.

13. Cut a hole into the center to create a mini succulent garden attraction.

14. Or, create a tiny zen garden!


Leonora Epstein is Hunker's Senior Director of Content. She has previously served as Executive Editor at HelloGiggles and as BuzzFeed's Deputy Editorial Director. She is the co-author of "X vs. Y: A Culture War, a Love Story" (Abrams, 2014). Feel free to reach out at leonora@hunker.com.

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