When in Tokyo, Get Thee to the Wired Hotel (Especially if You're Going to the 2020 Olympics)

Photos by Peter Schweitzer

What: Wired Hotel Asakusa

Where: Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan

Style: Japanese Contemporary

The Asakusa district is home to some of Tokyo's most popular destinations, including Sensoji Temple, the oldest temple in the city, and the Tokyo Skytree, the world's tallest freestanding broadcasting tower. Heavily damaged during the bombing of World War II, the area has been rebuilt and features a mix of historic attractions and new hot spots. With bold art and a bustling bar and restaurant, Wired Hotel, which opened a year and a half ago, is bringing a fresh take on hospitality to the neighborhood.

The property is the first hotel project for Cafe Company, which has over 100 cafes and restaurants across Japan. For their hotel debut, the company wanted to showcase the work of local craftsmen. Their handiwork is not only on display throughout the hotel and guest rooms, but in some cases is also available for purchase.

Set in the Asakusa Kokono Club building, the hotel offers a variety of accommodations from a spacious penthouse to dormitory-style options for budget-conscious travelers. The 30 guest rooms are outfitted with Swedish Duxiana mattresses and feature original artwork and custom furniture. The hostel bunk rooms share a bathroom and stylish lounge space.

Cafe Company worked with Portland, Oregon–based firm OMFGCO, known for its work with the Ace Hotel, on the branding and design details. Their influence can be seen throughout the space, from the noren screens in the lobby to the cheeky signage. (One level of the hostel that is not accessible by elevator is cleverly rebranded as the "secret floor.")

The focus on community extends beyond design. The hotel hosts cultural events open to the public in the Wired Chaya restaurant and bar, allowing guests and locals to mingle. With Tokyo set to host the 2020 Olympics, Wired Hotel is not only focused on serving the upcoming influx of visitors, but also on enriching life for those in its own backyard.

Wired Chaya, located on the hotel's lobby floor, serves traditional Japanese breakfast in the morning. At dinner, guests can enjoy seasonal dishes made using ingredients from within a 100-mile radius. The desserts are in collaboration with local sweet makers.

Wired Chaya features a curated selection of sakes. A blue bonsai motif decorates the back of the bar.

The restaurant has a minimalist vibe that's warmed up with wood furnishings and velvet-upholstered seating.

Guests are encouraged to see how many cats they can spot in this hyotan-shaped painting.

The hotel also encourages guests to fully explore Asakusa, either on hotel staff–led tours or on their own with the help of these DIY guidebooks.

When they're not tucked away in their bunks, hostel guests can kick back in the comfortable lounge, which features custom leather chairs and parquet wood floors.

Each guest room has a unique design and incorporates local art, such as the cat sculpture in the corner of room 605. Artisans were used to create everything from the furniture to the printed hairdryer bags.

Five of the superior rooms boast spacious terraces, where visitors can take in the Tokyo skyline.

The design integrates copper, wood, and concrete, and puts a contemporary twist on traditional Japanese materials and motifs.

A deep soaking tub with a waterfall faucet offers the ultimate way to end the day.

The sleek bathrooms are accented with handmade traditional wood stools and buckets.

Embossed leather signs replace the usual "do not disturb" door hangers.


Elizabeth Stamp

Elizabeth Stamp

Elizabeth Stamp is a freelance writer splitting her time between New York and Los Angeles. Her work has appeared in Architectural Digest, Elle Decor, and CNN Style.