Cuban oregano (Plectranthus amboinicus) is a leafy, aromatic plant used both for visual interest and for culinary purposes. Alternative names for this plant include false oregano, Spanish thyme, Mexican thyme and Mexican mint. The leaves possess both strong aroma and taste. Use the leaves fresh and chopped to compliment foods in a similar way as you would use other aromatic herbs, such as sage, rosemary and oregano.

Step 1

Plant Cuban oregano in a pot, using well-draining potting soil. Keep the pot in a sunny area of your home, a greenhouse or outdoors in full sun or semi-shade during the spring and summer. This plant will not survive in cold temperatures -- bring it indoors before nighttime temperatures fall to 40 degrees.

Step 2

Water Cuban oregano slowly from the top of the soil until the water runs out from the pot's drainage holes. Water again only when the top inch of soil is bone-dry.

Step 3

Fertilize Cuban oregano during it's active growing seasons -- spring and summer. Use slow release granules for potted plants and water the plant after you apply the fertilizer. Use the exact amount or less advised on the fertilizer package to avoid over-fertilizing. Over-fertilizing this plant causes excessive growth and lessens the leave's aroma and flavor.

Step 4

Prune the plant if it begins to sprawl or whenever you wish to use the leaves in cooking. You may also propagate Cuban oregano by placing the cuttings in water until roots form. Once roots form, plant the cutting in potting soil.