How to Get Vaseline Out of Couches

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Things You'll Need

  • White cloth

  • Butter knife

  • Cornstarch, talc or baby powder

  • Vacuum, small broom or straight edge

  • Dry-cleaning solvent

  • Dish-washing soap (Optional)

Tip

Apply a combination of 2 cups of cool water with a tbsp. of dish-washing liquid to the stain if the solvent doesn’t work. Blot the mixture onto the stain with a white cloth and allow the liquid to soak into the stain. Rinse it off with cool water once the stain has disappeared then blot dry.

Warning

Test the dry-cleaning solvent on a hidden spot of the couch before you use it on the stain, such as on the back. Doing so will let you know if the solvent will have an adverse reaction to the fabric and cause discoloration.

Petroleum jelly has lots of uses around the house, but sticking to couches typically isn't one of them. Petroleum jelly is an oily substance that tends to leave stains behind, particularly when it's on fabric. The grease in vaseline infiltrates the fabric on your couch and typically leaves a dark spot as a reminder of its presence. Unless you want to see the evidence, you'll need get to get rid of that pesky stain. Fortunately, doing so is fairly simple.

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Step 1

Remove the excess petroleum jelly from the couch. Either blot the spot with a white cloth or scrape it off with a butter knife. Take care not to spread the stain further.

Step 2

Sprinkle cornstarch, talc or baby powder over the stained area. Pour just enough so that the stain is covered. Allow it to sit for about 15 minutes. The powder will absorb the grease, making the stain lighter and leaving less to remove. Vacuum the powder or remove it with a small broom or straight edge.

Step 3

Apply a dry-cleaning solvent to a white cloth. Blot the stain with the solvent-soaked cloth -- don't use a circular motion as it may cause the stain to soak deeper into the fabric. Continue to apply the solvent to the stain until the spot disappears. You may have to repeat this process several times until the stain is removed.

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references

Heather Vecchioni

Heather Vecchioni is a freelance writer in Maryland. Her work has appeared in several animal-interest magazines, as well as Baltimore-area newspapers and publications. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Maryland. She has worked in the veterinary field for over 10 years and has been writing and editing professionally for over five.