How to Get Rid of Flies in the House During Winter Time

Flies are an expected nuisance in the spring and summer, but some homeowners will find themselves in the midst of an infestation in cold winter months. Some species of flies, such as face and cluster flies, lay eggs in the cracks and crevasses of a home. These eggs hatch throughout the winter, and the little flies have nowhere to go but the home. The cooler weather chills the bugs down, making them fly slower than warm weather flies. You can always swat or spray them, but a few other common pest control products should eliminate the flies.

Step 1

Plug spaces or cracks with cold weather caulk. Filling in these gaps will keep out drafts and seal off the eggs. Concentrate on holes in undisturbed areas, such as the basement and attic, where flies are most likely to lay eggs.

Step 2

Hang sticky fly traps around the inside of your home. These traps are normally a roll on sticky paper you unravel and hang from the ceiling. Flies are instantly stuck to any trap they touch and die on the paper. The number of sticky traps needed will depend on the amount of flies in the house. Space sticky traps at least 10 feet apart to maximize the number of flies caught per room, and throw away the traps when they become littered with dead bugs.

Step 3

Place stationary fly traps in heavily infested rooms. Once the flies enter the domed traps, they are unable to fly out and fall into the insecticide in the base of the trap.

Step 4

Set off bug foggers to eradicate stubborn flies. Close all windows and doors, unplug electronics and turn off pilot lights that might ignite insecticide fumes. Place a layer of newspaper in the center of the infested room, and set the bomb on the paper. Depress the trigger and quickly leave the room, closing the door behind you. Leave the room closed for at least two hours, or as advised in the directions. Open doors and windows to aerate the room, dispose of the empty bomb and newspaper, and clean all surfaces to remove dead flies and traces of insecticide.


Louise Lawson

Louise Lawson has been a published author and editor for more than 10 years. Lawson specializes in pet and food-related articles, utilizing her 15 years as a sous chef and as a dog breeder, handler and trainer to produce pieces for online and print publications.