How to Remove Glue From Rubber

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Things You'll Need

  • Dish soap

  • Abrasive pad

  • Acetone or turpentine

  • Old toothbrush

  • Soft cloth

  • Rubber gloves

  • Safety goggles

Tip

Have patience. If there is a lot of glue, the process could take half an hour or more. It is important to go slowly as too much abrasion can damage the rubber.

Only remove glue if it is necessary. Removing the glue takes a lot of chemicals that can be damaging to the skin. If you can replace the object, rather than removing the glue, it is best to do so.

Removing glue from rubber is an easy process.

Rubber is used for a wide variety of tasks and objects. Rubber is often glued to another material as a protective barrier to prevent slipping and other problems. Sometimes the glue on rubber must be removed, or glue accidentally falls onto rubber that was not supposed to be glued. If this happens, it is possible to break down the glue and remove it from the rubber. This project requires a lot of patience, and may take several attempts before it is completed effectively. Always use caution when working with harsh chemicals.

Step 1

Peel away as much of the glue as possible with your fingernail. Have patience, and work slowly. Take care that you do not cut the rubber itself with your fingernails. If your nails are very long, cut them before peeling away at the glue to protect the rubber.

Step 2

Wash the rubber in a solution of soapy water. Scrub the glued area with an abrasive pad. Rinse the rubber with clear water and dry with a soft cloth.

Step 3

Put on the safety goggles and rubber gloves. Pour some acetone or turpentine on a soft cloth and rub over the surface of the rubber. Make sure to work in a well-ventilated area or even outdoors. Outdoors is best to prevent headaches and temporary breathing problems.

Step 4

Allow the acetone to sit for five to 10 minutes. If it starts to dry, apply more acetone with a soft cloth.

Step 5

Use the toothbrush to scrape away the remaining glue. The toothbrush is gentle and abrasive at the same time, and the glue should peel right off. If the glue seems like it is still stuck, then switch to turpentine rather than acetone.

Step 6

Repeat the process until all of the glue is gone from the surface of the rubber. Wash the rubber with a solution of soapy water and rinse with clear water. Allow the rubber to dry before using or re-gluing.

references

Brenda Priddy

Brenda Priddy has more than 10 years of crafting and design experience, as well as more than six years of professional writing experience. Her work appears in online publications such as Donna Rae at Home, Five Minutes for Going Green and Daily Mayo. Priddy also writes for Archstone Business Solutions and holds an Associate of Arts in English from McLennan Community College.