How to Get Moisture Out of the Refrigerator

To keep food within the confines of the refrigerator, there needs to be some moisture. When there is too much moisture, mold and bacteria can begin to grow rapidly. Odors can buildup and cause food to begin to decay rather quickly.

View Looking Out From Inside Of Refrigerator As Woman Takes Out Healthy Packed Lunch In Container
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To keep food within the confines of the refrigerator, there needs to be some moisture.

Before doing a full investigation into why the major appliance is experiencing high levels of moisture, there are a few things to do first.

What to Do First

Give the refrigerator a thorough and deep cleaning, which Reader's Digest suggests you do regularly. Throw out any fresh food that is even slightly questionable, and ditch half-used bottles and jars of sauces and condiments. Take all of the items out of the refrigerator and wipe them down individually before giving all of the compartments, shelves and other areas of the interior of the fridge a deep clean.

Use a mix of 1 gallon of warm water with a few drops of mild dish soap to wipe down all of the contents of the fridge that will be placed back inside the appliance, as well as all of the interior surfaces. Add a 1/4 cup of chlorine bleach to this mix if the refrigerator has a pungent smell or old food splotches on the sides and in the drawers. If the refrigerator has odors or streaks of mold on its sides or shelving, then a fine layer of baking soda sprinkled over these areas can take down the unwanted scents and growths.

Check under the appliance for a pan and remove it. Thoroughly clean the pan's housing, as well as the pan itself, before pushing it back into place. Vacuum the coils beneath and behind the refrigerator with the brush attachment of a vacuum cleaner to allow the appliance to run effectively and efficiently.

Ways to Reduce Moisture in the Fridge

To reduce moisture in the refrigerator, there are a few things you can do.

One way to cut down on moisture would be to place a desiccant dehumidifier to absorb moisture inside of the refrigerator. The fridge dehumidifier contains minerals that absorb moisture and remove ethylene gas buildup from vegetables and fruits, as well as odors.

Fans placed throughout the home can also lower the overall humidity that can build up in your home, particularly in bathrooms and kitchens.

You should keep the opening and closing of the refrigerator doors to a minimum, as this will keep the moisture level at a good balance. Another good preventive measure: keep open box of bicarbonate soda stored in the fridge and changed out monthly can also reduce moisture and odors on a regular basis.

Always store food in containers with well-fitting lids. But don't crowd food in storage containers within the appliance. Leave at least an inch of space between each container so that air may circulate well throughout the entire interior of the appliance.

A refrigerator thermometer can ensure that the temperature stays between 34- and 40-degrees Fahrenheit.

Frigidaire Dehumidifier Recall

A fridge dehumidifier can reduce moisture in the air to maintain a relatively ideal humidity level. These work well to reduce moisture in the room and help the appliance to run more efficiently, particularly in high humid areas.

Frigidaire offers dehumidifiers in 30-, 50- and 70-pint configurations. The Frigidaire dehumidifier warranty can ensure that you have a chance to use the appliance and possibly trade it in for a different pint configuration. If there is a Frigidaire dehumidifier recall, contact the company regarding a refund or exchange.


Kimberley McGee

Kimberley McGee

Kimberley McGee is an award-winning journalist with 20+ years of experience writing for a variety of clients, including The New York Times, Las Vegas Review-Journal Home section and other national publications. As a professional writer she has researched, interviewed sources and written about home improvement, interior design and related business trends. She earned a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Her full bio and clips can be viewed at www.vegaswriter.com.