How to Fix Moen Quick Connect Faucets

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Certain types of Moen faucets, including widespread bathroom faucets, pull-down kitchen faucets and those with attached sprayers, require flexible hoses that are separate from the faucet body.
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Certain types of Moen faucets, including widespread bathroom faucets, pull-down kitchen faucets and those with attached sprayers, require flexible hoses that are separate from the faucet body. When these faucets uses a Moen quick connect fitting to join the hoses, they may be known as quick connect faucets. But the term "quick connect" really refers to just the fittings. Moen makes two different types: the Moen Duralock fitting and the Moen Hydrolock fitting.

When these fittings are properly installed, it's rare for anything to go wrong. But one of them might leak if you don't follow Moen's installation instructions. There's nothing complicated about the instructions — after all, they are quick connect fittings. And Moen faucet quick connect removal is just as simple.

The Moen Duralock fitting and the Moen Hydrolock fitting are fairly recent innovations, and you won't find them on older Moen faucets. On older faucets, the connections are made with threaded compression fittings, which require a wrench or a pair of locking piers, if not both, to connect or disconnect them or stop a leak.

The easiest way to determine which connection your faucet has is to go under the sink cabinet with a flashlight and find the hose or hoses that connect the handles to the spout, the spout to the sprayer or the pull-down faucet head to the faucet body, depending on the type of fixture you have. Follow the hose until you find the connector, which is usually close to the base of the spout, and look for threads. If you see any, then the connector is a conventional one, not a quick-connect, and you will need a wrench to tighten or loosen it.

If you see a straight metal shaft on the hose connection, instead of a threaded one, then it has either a Hydrolock or Duralock quick connect fitting. Both are plastic and work the same way, but they look different, and the procedures for removing them are different, too.

The Moen Duralock fitting is white, and it has a black plastic button. To disconnect the fitting, press the button in, using your finger or a pair of pliers if it's stuck, and pull the hose out of the connection. To reconnect the fitting, simply insert the hose into the fitting and push until you hear a clicking sound. You don't need to push the button.

The Mown Hydrolock hose connector is black, and it has two white tabs. When you want to disconnect it, you squeeze the tabs together with your fingers or a pair of pliers, which causes a button to pop out on the opposite side of the fitting, loosening the connection so you can pull it apart. To reconnect the fitting, insert the hose into the fitting and push the white button all the way in until the white tabs appear on the other side.

When a Moen quick connect fitting leaks, it's usually because it wasn't connected properly in the first place. Usually, you can resolve the issue by taking it apart and putting it back together the right way. It's also possible that the O-ring on the end of the male hose connector is worn out. Pry it off with a screwdriver, replace it and the leak should stop.

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Chris Deziel is a contractor, builder and general fix-it pro who has been active in the construction trades for 40 years. He has degrees in science and humanities and years of teaching experience. An avid craftsman and musician, Deziel began writing on home improvement topics in 2010. He worked as an expert consultant with eHow Now and Pro Referral -- a Home Depot site. A DIYer by nature, Deziel regularly shares tips and tricks for a better home and garden at Hunker.com.

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