Corian is a manmade solid-surface material created and manufactured by the DuPont company. Corian is frequently used as a countertop material, but can be cut, shaped and used for virtually any craft or constructive purpose. Two types of glue are effective for gluing Corian. When attaching Corian to a wood surface, a five-minute epoxy works quite well. However, to glue one Corian piece to another, the DuPont company recommends that you only use the DuPont-manufactured Joint Adhesive for DuPont Corian Solid Surfaces for success.

Stainless steel kitchen
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Corian countertops can give the appearance of granite without the hefty price.

Step 1

Sand the surfaces that you intend to adhere with 400-grit sandpaper. Only sand the wood and Corian enough to create a rough surface. Clean away any sawdust or debris completely with a rag soaked in denatured alcohol.

Step 2

Apply five-minute epoxy glue to adhere Corian to wood; apply the Joint Adhesive for DuPont Corian Solid Surfaces to adhere Corian to itself. In both instances, mix the two parts of the adhesive together in a small, disposable plastic container according to the manufacturer's instructions. Only mix the amount that you will need. Spread a thin layer of the adhesive over the areas to be adhered with a craft stick or other flat, disposable tool. Spread the glue right over the edges to ensure that the entire surface is covered.

Step 3

Press the two glued surfaces together. Take care to be accurate. Clamp the two surfaces together by tightening your spring clamps as tightly as possible. Use as many clamps as you have and spread them out evenly -- at least every 6 inches -- to place equal pressure on the glue. Glue will ooze out of the edges. Do not wipe it up; you will remove it later when it is dry.

Step 4

Leave the clamps on while the epoxy/joint adhesive cures -- at least overnight. The longer you keep the Corian clamped, the better the glue will hold.

Step 5

Remove the clamps and sand off the excess joint adhesive or epoxy. Start with 100-grit sandpaper, then use 150-grit. If the glue is still not gone, jump up to 220-grit sandpaper.