Bavaria is a region within today's Germany, near Austria and Switzerland. For several centuries, Bavaria has produced exquisite china items that are highly collectible today.

Farmhouse in field , Bavaria , Germany
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Bavaria is noted for the kind of clay needed to make fine china.

Special Bavarian Attributes

Fine white china must be made from a clay mineral called kaolin, and outside of China and France, Bavaria is one of the few areas that has mass deposits of this clay, also known as china clay or kaolinite.

History of Bavarian China

The earliest Bavarian china factory was founded in 1794. The Royal Bayreuth company made plates, tea cups, pitchers and figurines. Other Bavarian china companies, such as Johann Haviland, Winterling and Hutschenreuther, have operations that are more than a century old.

What Sets It Apart

Bavarian china is characterized by fine translucent porcelain and hand-painted colorful decorations. While floral patterns are generally used on dinnerware, hand-painted figurines are also prevalent. Paint colors are almost exclusively blue, pink, yellow, green and red. Silver and gold trim is common as well.

How to Recognize Bavarian China

Every piece of Bavarian china has an identification stamp on it. Antique Bavarian china stamps help to authenticate a piece by tracing a company's marking history. For instance, Royal Bayreuth changes the bottom stamp regularly, so a certain stamp is indicative of a certain time period.