How to Troubleshoot an Oven Light Blinking on a Thermador Gas Range

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It is pretty easy to troubleshoot an oven light blinking on a Thermador gas range.
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If you love to cook, choosing a Thermador gas range can help you enjoy a luxury, restaurant-level experience at home. These ranges are designed for professional chefs, which will make every meal you create memorable. If you have technical difficulties with your Thermador gas range, like a blinking oven light, it is fairly straightforward to troubleshoot it yourself and get your appliance back in working order in no time.

Basic Safety Considerations

Before you begin to troubleshoot your Thermador gas range, you should be sure that the heat is turned off. Never touch a hot range while trying to figure out what the issue is with your oven light. Furthermore, if you will be moving the range, disconnecting parts or doing anything related to power, be sure to unplug the appliance first.

Thermador Preheat Light Blinking

The Thermador line of gas ranges features a preheat setting while the range gets to temperature. This is important for certain items you might wish to prepare, like meats, which should not be removed from cold temperatures and cooked until they can be placed in an oven that is to temperature.

During the preheat stage, the Thermador gas range will display a light to let you know its status. Once the range reaches the appropriate temperature, the light will turn off.

In addition, when the oven status changes from the normal bake phase to the extended baking phase, the indicator light will flash. All of these functions are normal for your Thermador gas range. If you find the light is not turning off as it should or is turning on during different parts of the baking cycle, you may need to troubleshoot further.

Thermador Oven Blinking Blue Light

Your Thermador oven uses a blinking blue light in conjunction with the normal heating light to alert you to a problem with the appliance. Depending on the number of flashes of each light, you can interpret the error code that the appliance is reporting.

The following error codes will likely be identified in your owner's manual:

  • E1: 22 (two flashes of blue light, two flashes of heating light) – EEPROM Error (Thermador range error code 22)
  • E2: 01 (no flashes of blue light, one flash of heating light) – Control not calibrated
  • E3: 10 (one flash of blue light, no flashes of heating light) – Sensor open
  • E4: 12 (one flash of blue light, two flashes of heating light) – Sensor shorted
  • E5: 21 (two flashes of blue light, one flash of heating light) – Potentionmeter failure
  • E6: 32 (three flashes of blue light, two flashes of heating light) – Over temperature cooking
  • E7: 23 (two flashes of blue light, three flashes of heating light) – Over temperature cleaning
  • E9: 43 (four flashes of blue light, three flashes of heating light) – No cooling fans
  • E11: 44 (four flashes of blue light, three flashes of heating light) – Door latch fault
  • E12: 11 (one flash of blue light, one flash of heating light) – Board not connected
  • E13: 13 (one flash of blue light, three flashes of heating light) – Lift off error
  • E14: 55 (five flashes of blue light, five flashes of heating light) – Selector switch error

Depending on the error code you are receiving, you may be able to troubleshoot yourself (for instance, a door latch fault under error E11 could be repaired on your own with a replacement door latch). However, other errors may require the assistance of a professional Thermador repair technician. Contact the manufacturer for more help with identifying someone qualified to fix your appliance.

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Danielle Smyth is a writer and content marketer from upstate New York. She holds a Master of Science in Publishing from Pace University. She owns her own content marketing agency, Wordsmyth Creative Content Marketing (www.wordsmythcontent.com), and she enjoys writing home and DIY articles and blogs for clients in a variety of related industries. She also runs her own lifestyle blog, Sweet Frivolity (www.sweetfrivolity.com).

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