Propane torches are available in many sizes to use for different applications. Small- to medium-size torches are used to melt metals for jewelry-making, while large torches are used to burn weeds out of a field or off fence lines. Air and propane mix in the nozzle to form a flame after the torch is lit. Flux solder, melted metals and debris from burning weeds can stop up the nozzle so it sputters and the flame will not light. Cleaning the nozzle occasionally will allow the flame to flow from the nozzle in an even height.

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Propane torches are small in size to access items in cramped areas.

Step 1

Fill a pot about three-quarters full of water. Place the pot on a stove burner and turn it on "High."

Step 2

Turn the propane torch nozzle counter-clockwise to unscrew it with one hand, while holding the torch in the other hand. Pull the nozzle straight off.

Step 3

Place the nozzle in the pot of water when it begins to boil. Let the nozzle boil for 10 minutes, turning the heat down if necessary so it does not boil over.

Step 4

Turn the burner off and remove the nozzle from the pot with tongs. Place the nozzle on a dry cloth and allow it to cool to the touch. Dry the nozzle exterior off with the cloth. Shake the nozzle firmly at a downward angle to remove water from inside the nozzle.

Step 5

Let the nozzle completely air dry for 24 hours so it does not retain moisture inside.