A Whiskey Factory in Philadelphia Was Converted Into Your Next Weekend Getaway

Photos by Matthew Williams

A former 19th-century whiskey factory in Philadelphia's Fishtown neighborhood is now a cool place to spend the night.

"We wanted it to feel somewhat residential, almost like it's someone's apartment," co-owner Randy Cook said about Wm. Mulherin's Sons, a dual-concept property that features a four-room hotel and an Italian restaurant.

When Cook and the two other owners came across the site, they saw it as a way to draw attention to the storied history of the building and its locale. It still had many original details that they wanted to preserve — including arched windows that date to the 1920s and aged brick on the exterior — they just needed to be intertwined with more modern features.

The founders turned to artist Stacey Rozich to meet these classic touches with a more contemporary eye, and she created a whimsical hand-painted mural in the restaurant as well as toile wallpaper in the rooms. Custom furnishings were created by Tim Lewis Studio, which complement other natural wood touches meant to evoke a simple, almost Nordic state of mind. Now guests can step comfortably into the past, whether it's to dine or sleep.

exterior
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credit: Matthew Williams

Behind this unassuming brick exterior is the ground-floor Italian restaurant, which opened last year. The upstairs hotel opened in the spring — and guests can check in with the restaurant staff.

bedroom
credit: Matthew Williams

Each of the guest rooms feature accents that speak to the building's industrial roots. In this room, a bed with a walnut headboard complements the abundance of wood on the walls and ceiling.

living area
credit: Matthew Williams

In this guest room, brass detailing is the main feature. A light fixture by Jason Miller, sourced through Roll & Hill, "adds a different vibe to the place so it doesn't feel contrived," Cook said.

living room
credit: Matthew Williams

This guest room features a living area with a striking blue leather couch.

bathroom
credit: Matthew Williams

Minimalist bathrooms feature clawfoot tubs — another design detail carried over from the 19th century — and cement details.

bathroom
credit: Matthew Williams

Cement detailing, like on this sink, offers up a modern touch, while the wood cabinets are in keeping with traditional accents.