How to Stop Mice From Eating Through Electrical Wiring

Mice can be difficult to control because they breed quickly and can take over a space in no time. They tend to invade homes in the cooler months to stay warm and find food. By chewing through wires, mice can short out appliances and damage the electrical system. Chewed wires inside walls can also be a fire hazard. Exposed wires can spark and cause walls to catch on fire. The key to controlling mice and keeping them from eating wiring is to prevent their entry into the home. If they have already taken up residence, there are other methods to control their presence.

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Prevent mice from chewing electrical wiring.

Step 1

Seal cracks to prevent entry into the home. Seal all cracks in the foundation that are ¼ inch or larger by filling them with caulk or canned spray foam insulation. Mice can squeeze their bodies through a hole no larger than ¼ inch, so even the smallest cracks can be an entryway.

Step 2

Kill mice with bait traps if they have already come into the dwelling. There are a variety of rodenticides available to home owners. These contain bait that is poisoned. The mice eat the bait or take it back to the nest and then die. This type of bait needs to be placed close to the nest and out of the way of pets.

Step 3

Put out sonic mouse deterrent devices. To enhance the use of rodenticide, these devices can be plugged in to emit a sound that mice don't like. Thesy use electricity to put out a contact sound wave that humans and household pets cannot hear. area.

Step 4

Spray a mouse deterrent around electrical boxes, in attics near wiring or anywhere else you want to deter mice from habituating. These sprays emit an odor that mice don't like and encourages them to go elsewhere.


Mary Johnson-Gerard, Ph.D.

Mary Johnson-Gerard began writing professionally in 1975 and expanded to writing online in 2003. She has been published on the Frenzyness Divorce Blog and on Neumind International Pte Ltd. Her book "When Divorce Hurts Too Long—Ouch" was published in 2009. Johnson-Gerard holds a doctorate in educational psychology from the University of Missouri.