Which Weed Killers Contain Triclopyr?

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You've pulled them and cut them and carted them off to the garbage bin only to see them sprout up again in the same precarious place. Weeds are inherently a nuisance. They sprout up in the middle of a painstakingly designed flower garden, wind their way through a perfectly planted vegetable garden and sprout up under well-manicured bushes and at the base of towering trees. To rid your outdoor spaces of pesky weeds, a herbicide containing triclopyr can take out unwanted sprouts over large areas rather quickly and is safe if used correctly.

Which Weed Killers Contain Triclopyr?
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What Is Triclopyr?

Weeds have long been a nuisance. When triclopyr came to the commercial market in 1979, it was a near-magic serum. It targeted broadleaf weeds and hard-to-kill woody brushes while leaving lush grasses, flowering shrubs and young trees in good health.

By not affecting the typical garden favorites, triclopyr became a popular herbicide for large and small areas that were affected by weed growth. It is also good for controlling rust disease in fresh crops.

Dangers of Triclopyr

When sprayed over a large area, the herbicide is productive and has a small negative impact on the environment and wildlife. It can be toxic to geese, ducks, fish and other freshwater inhabitants in large runoff doses.

Weed Killers for Home Use

Scotts Miracle-Gro Company is known for creating products to get your roses to bloom bigger and your lawn to look lovely no matter what the water or sun conditions. They also produce effective weed killers that are safe to use around pets and children. These products are targeted to kill weeds so they won't adversely affect the hedge that lines the driveway or any surrounding plants that crowd the weed-prone areas around the home.

The heavily used Ortho Weed B Gon contains triethylamine salt, which is a form of triclopyr that uses 8 percent of the ingredient. Weed B Gone is ideal for ridding lawns of weeds without killing the lush expanse of bright green blades.

Ortho MAX Poison Ivy and Tough Brush Killer has 0.7 percent triclopyr. This is an effective tree and brush killer that is formulated to kill woody plants and unwanted, invasive vines, including kudzu, poison ivy and poison oak.

List of Herbicides

On the commercial product shelves, there are rows of top performers that use triclopyr or a derivative. Trade names that use triclopyr 600 EC include:

  • Scrubcutter
  • Victory TM
  • Brush Off
  • Grazon

Brand-name weed killers that use triclopyr 300 EC include:

  • Renovate
  • Renovate Gorsekiller

Commercial Weed Killers

For more serious weed killers, Dow AgroSciences has a line that contains triclopyr as its only active ingredient. These include:

  • Garlon 3A
  • Garlon 34
  • Pathfinder II
  • Turflon
  • Release

Each has a different level of the triclopyr. They are mainly put to use on highways and byways, taking down roadside hazards that block or impede drivers and other large-scale areas. They also have carrier compounds and contain petroleum distillates, natural oil solvents, ethanol and kerosene.

Weed Killers for Use Around Livestock

There are three Dow AgroSciences products that combine safe ingredients with triclopyr. If you have a backyard chicken coop or a large-scale dairy or farm, you should be careful of what type of weed killer you use around your animals. The following are recommended for use around farm animals and livestock:

  • Access – Combines picloram with triclopyr and is best for industrial areas.

  • Confront – This specialty herbicide combines clopyralid with triclopyr. It is often used in common green areas such as parks and golf courses where wildlife can take up residence.

  • Crossbow – Uses triclopyr with 2,4-D and is suitable for large livestock grazing areas.
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Kimberley McGee is an award-winning journalist with 20+ years of experience writing for a variety of clients, including The New York Times, Las Vegas Review-Journal Home section and other national publications. As a professional writer she has researched, interviewed sources and written about home improvement, interior design and related business trends. She earned a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Her full bio and clips can be viewed at www.vegaswriter.com.

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