Teak wood comes from deciduous trees, making teak furniture more expensive than most furniture from conifers. Furniture builders often use teak, a hardwood, to make chairs and outdoor furniture, according to Utah State University. You can stain teak a darker color and prevent the silver color that unfinished outdoor teak gets when it weathers. Staining teak requires a few simple supplies and steps, and almost anyone can do it.

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Step 1

Fill in any scratches or open wood grain with a wood filler to create a smooth appearance. This step is optional and depends on how you want the finished product to look. Teak wood has a naturally smooth surface, and some people prefer to allow wood grain to show as much as possible for a more natural look. If that's the case, using a wood filler on teak may be unnecessary.

Step 2

To use a wood filler, buy one that matches the color of the unstained teak as closely as possible. Smooth it over any scratched or grainy areas with a putty knife, as recommended by Lowe's.

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Step 3

Sand the furniture using 120 grit sandpaper on any rough areas. Follow that with 220 grit sandpaper to smooth the surface of the entire piece.

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Step 4

Paint a thick layer of sanding sealer over the furniture. Allow it to soak into the teak for a few minutes before wiping off any extra sealer with a rag. The sealer helps the stain go on more evenly, according to Lowe's.

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Step 5

Allow the sealer to dry completely before staining the teak furniture.

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Step 6

Paint a layer of stain onto the furniture. The stain color gets darker the longer it is allowed to sit on the furniture. Wipe off any extra stain that does not soak in, and allow the stain to dry completely. If the stained color is not dark enough, add another layer of stain.

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Step 7

Apply a finish after staining the furniture with an oil-based or water-based stain. Stains tint the wood but do not offer much protection. A layer of finish will help hold in the stain color and prevent it from fading in high-wear spots. Oil finishes look the most natural but do not protect the wood as much as other stain types. Polyurethane finishes are very strong and can withstand water, according to Lowe's. Lacquer finishes are durable and attractive, but they require several coats with sanding in between coats.