How to Stop a Propane Tank From Leaking

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Things You'll Need

  • 1 cup liquid dish soap

  • 1 cup warm water

  • Spray bottle

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Propane tanks, which often come in a cylinder shape, store propane fuel for heating or cooking and must be stored and handled properly to prevent any serious accidents from occurring. Hearing a hissing sound or sensing a strong smell of gas in the area of where a propane tank is stored are typically how leaks are discovered. As soon as you think there might be a leak in your tank you should take immediate action by checking for a leak and then repairing the area.

Step 1

Turn off the main gas supply valve immediately once you smell gas or suspect a leak.

Step 2

Add 1 cup of liquid dish washing soap and 1 cup of warm water to a spray bottle. Spray a strong steam of the mixture all around the valve and gauge areas of the tank.

Step 3

Examine the tank for any signs of leakage by looking for bubbles creating by the soap and water mixture that you sprayed. If there is only a small amount of bubbles that appear then it means you have a small leak, and larger bubbles can indicate a bigger leak.

Step 4

Tighten the screws on the face gauge using a Phillips head screwdriver. You may also need to twist the valve clockwise to tighten it. This can be a simple solution for any small leak.

Step 5

Wait for at least 10 minutes and then spray the solution of the areas again to find any bubbles. If there appears to still be a leak you should note all areas of the leaks and any damage areas.

Step 6

Call your local propane dealer and tell them that you have discovers a leak in your propane tank. It's important that you don't try to repair the tank any further yourself and let a professional determine a time to come to your home to repair or pick up the tank.

Warning

Make sure there are no flames or flammable materials near your propane tank as soon as your smell gas. For major leaks, if you can’t reach your propane dealer you should call the fire department or 911.

references

Greg Lindberg

Greg Lindberg is a graduate of Purdue University with a Bachelor of Liberal Arts degree in creative writing. His professional writing experience includes three years of technical writing for an agriculture IT department and a major pharmaceutical company, as well as four years as staff writer for a music and film webzine.