A Palm Springs Property's Unusual Shape Heightens Its Midcentury Design

As a licensed architect and construction hobbyist in Los Angeles, Pavlina and Carter Williams are accustomed to finding the potential in long-neglected properties. The two spend their weekends renovating finds, and when they discovered a gem tucked away in the Coachella Valley that hadn't been occupied for nearly a decade, they decided to update it as an homage to mid-century modernist design. Originally built in 1956, the home has sweeping views of the desert and an eye-catching dome addition that the pair rightfully agreed was its greatest asset. But, it needed a lot of work. The couple spent a year ripping out carpet and vinyl linoleum and knocking down walls that blocked the desert sun from inside. Then, they gave the dome the finish it needed to really stand out: a puzzle of geometric windows. "Being here really calms you down and stimulates your creativity," Pavlina Williams said. And although the duo is already working on their next Palm Springs upgrade, she said that this reimagined address is still her favorite work to date.

exterior
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credit: Sammy Easterling

Before the renovation, the home didn't showcase the desert scenery. Now that the property features 360 views, guests can enjoy the landscape, which includes the area's famed white windmills in the distance.

living room
credit: Sammy Easterling

Triangular and trapezoid-shaped windows are all custom-created from various brands, including Jeld-Wen and Milgard.

living room
credit: Sammy Easterling

The floors are polished concrete. To soften up the feel of the living room, they placed this rug from CB2 in the center. The metal and wood staircase is from Fontanot.

stairs
credit: Sammy Easterling

The couple painted the walls an eggshell white from Sherwin Williams to accentuate the natural light. This also allowed them to decorate with playful colors.

kitchen
credit: Sammy Easterling

When furnishing the home, the couple focused on finding mid-century modern pieces that were bright and cheerful, much like the space itself. For the kitchen, they purchased appliances from Sears, a faucet from LightInTheBox, and paired the pieces with Ikea furniture.

study
credit: Sammy Easterling

The home was in rough shape when the Williams's bought it. By stripping the home down to its basics, like the study's brick walls, they were able to uncover the property's simple beauty.

exterior back
credit: Sammy Easterling

Although the home was built in the 1950s, the dome wasn't added until about two decades later. The outside garden, which features a variety of shapes, helps to unify the two eras of architecture.