There are few flowers that are as beautiful as a simple daisy. They can dress up well manicured flower beds and also look magnificent among roadside weeds. While daisies are a favorite flower of summer no matter where they are growing, what if they are located in a spot that just doesn't support them anymore? Can you move them to a different part of the lawn or bring them home from that roadside roost? Absolutely, if you time it just right and know what you are doing.

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Beautiful daisies

Step 1

When selecting a site for daisies, it is important to place them in a location with full sun. The best time of the year to transplant is spring, which will allow the root systems to take before winter. Some choose to transplant daisies right after they bloom in early summer.

Step 2

Prepare the new bed that the daisies will be moving to. Dig a hole twice the size and almost twice as deep as the root ball you are digging up. Fill the hole with water. Even though this will absorb before the new plants come in, it will assure that the new area is moist and will encourage the roots to take.

Step 3

If you are transplanting daisies by moving them from ground they are already planted in, you want to dig an extra 5 inches out from around the roots. If you are moving some daisies from a large clump, this will give you more that are likely to survive any transplant shock. The larger the root ball area is, the less shock damage will be done to the roots.

Step 4

Once you have the root ball dug, do not shake any dirt from it if at all possible. This will help keep the root ball intact and minimize shock. Place the root ball into the new location. Cover with dirt mixed with a third of mulch. Water again and if any dirt seems to have run off the roots, be sure to add more to cover. Tamp the dirt down again.

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Transplanted daisies in bloom

Keep your plants well watered for 3 weeks until the roots have a chance to become grounded in the new location. Sit back and enjoy the beauty of the daisies.