A Secluded New York Property Angles to Become the Perfect Beach House

Space was not an issue on this quiet slice of a cul-de-sac in Amagansett, New York. The lot is completely private, and its perch on a 100-foot-high bluff means that its ocean views are also entirely unobstructed. So, what exactly was the problem? The original property, which stood rotting and moldy at the center of the lot, was wasting its opportunity of almost dreamlike seclusion. Robert Young and his namesake firm realized that these red flags wouldn't do for a couple and their three young children who planned to escape here from New York City. They decided to demolish the structure, and instead, they built an L-shaped house that was angled toward the shore. Inside, they separated the common areas from the bedrooms to heighten relaxation, and they chose durable and energy-efficient materials that would stand up to a trio of boys. The goal was to take full advantage of the site, where a family could make the most of their space for years to come. "If one of the grandkids or great grandkids were to preserve and renovate it in 100 years, that would be the highest achievement," Young said.

Exterior
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credit: Frank Oudeman/OTTO

Young angled the home to take full advantage of the ocean view — something he said was especially important for when his clients arrived from the city. Unfinished cedar shingles cover the property, in keeping with a traditional beach house feel.

Great Room
credit: Frank Oudeman/OTTO

"The house is mostly made of solid wood," Young said. This is especially noticeable in the great room, which features pine planks that were painted white across the ceiling. Benjamin Moore's "Chantilly Lace" was used throughout the home.

Living Room
credit: Frank Oudeman/OTTO

A B&B Italia Ray sectional adds color to the bright living room. The owners wanted to have a summertime palette that was colorful and laid-back, and they requested that the furniture be easy enough to move for guests.

Kitchen
credit: Frank Oudeman/OTTO

Poured concrete unites the home's great room, which flows from the living area into the kitchen. A custom light gray lacquer was used on the kitchen's cabinets.

Kitchen Island
credit: Frank Oudeman/OTTO

Gubi 3A stools match countertops and an island made of Gioia Venatino marble slab.

Bedroom
credit: Frank Oudeman/OTTO

While the common area of the home is united by poured concrete, white oak flooring acts as the universal thread in the house's five bedrooms.

Bathroom
credit: Frank Oudeman/OTTO

In the bathroom, a custom quartz slab countertop surrounds a Lacava faucet, and lacquer cabinets stretch above slate flooring.

Bedroom
credit: Frank Oudeman/OTTO

The master bedroom looks out onto the ocean, so the owners requested that the palette reflect those shades. Linens by AREA cover their bed, and custom Dynamic windows and doors lead outside.

Outdoor Shower
credit: Frank Oudeman/OTTO

In a home where the sea is the main attraction, it's no wonder that the property would also include a private outdoor shower. Painted mahogany encloses the shower, which stands above an ipe deck.