The 3 Most Popular Low-Maintenance Plants

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How do we like our plants? ​Low maintenance.​ Because there is nothing worse than killing a plant when you can't keep up with its many needs. Fortunately, we now know what the most popular low-maintenance plants are, thanks to Instagram data compiled by the energy team at Uswitch, a comparison and switching service.

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According to the site, #houseplants encompasses a staggering seven million Instagram posts. Coming in first place is the philodendron with 1,663,489 hashtags on the platform. It only requires watering on a weekly basis, whenever the top part of the soil feels dry. This plant can even tolerate low light, but does best in medium indirect light.

With 373,160 hashtags, the second most popular low-maintenance plant is the snake plant. Every two to eight weeks, you'll want to water this green beauty whenever the soil is completely dry. During the winter, when the plant undergoes its dormant period, it can do with even less water. Plus, the snake plant can grow in a variety of light conditions, but it prefers indirect light.

In third place, we have the beloved spider plant. On Instagram, its hashtag appears 229,505 times. Interestingly, this is one of those plants that thrives on neglect, since it only needs to be watered occasionally and only when its soil is dried out. As for lighting, indirect will do, making it perfect for homes that are low on natural light.

Following the main three, we have:

  • Peace lily (soil should be kept slightly moist and in low light)
  • ZZ plant (water every two to three weeks and keep in low light)
  • Aloe vera (put it in sunlight and water when soil is dry)
  • Rubber tree (bright, indirect light and water only when topsoil is dry)
  • Jade plant (water when soil is mostly dry and keep in bright, indirect light)
  • Golden pothos (filtered sunlight and water when topsoil is dry)
  • Wax plant (likes some sunlight and water when about half the soil dries out)

With all this helpful info in mind, which plant do you plan to adopt next?

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Anna is a Los Angeles-based writer and editor who covers lifestyle and design content for Hunker. She's written for Apartment Therapy, the L.A. Times, Forge, and more. She previously worked as the lifestyle editor at HelloGiggles and deputy editor at So Yummy. Her email: anna.gragert@hunker.com